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Sachin tendulkar autobiography playing it my way pdf

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Get This Link to read/download book >>> Playing It My Way This is cricket icon, Sachin Tendulkar's life story in his own words - his journey from. Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Sachin Tendulkar made his Test debut in Pakistan at the Playing It My Way: My Autobiography by [Tendulkar, Sachin]. Playing It My Way book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. I'm delighted that my autobiography #PlayingitMyWay will be pub.


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The right of Sachin Tendulkar to be identified as the Author of the Work has been asserted by him in . enough to be able to spend my time Playing It My Way. Most cricket lovers will approach Sachin Tendulkar's Playing It My Way expecting a book of assessing how this autobiography shapes the public image of this. SACHIN. TENDULKAR. Playing It My Way. My Autobiography with Boria Majumdar The right of Sachin Tendulkar to be identified as the Author of the Work.

Remember how Sachin so maddeningly used to get dismissed against the Cronjes and Razzaqs with that half prod outside off stump? I Am Malala. Despite his celebrity status, Sachin Tendulkar has always remained a very private man, devoted to his family and his country. By the end of this book it only makes me feel proud of my idol my hero. No, cancel Yes, report it Thanks! He also writes about his fears like the first match jinx, him not able to give his complete best in certain situations in different tours throughout his career.

His child like enthusiasm for the game was plain to see on that day and throughout his career. This same enthusiasm is reflected right through the book as well. I enjoyed all of the anecdotes shared, most of which weren't public knowledge.

This is a must read for a Sachin fan. Even if you're not a fan of him or the game, it's still worth picking up to get an idea of literally the blood, sweat and tears that made up a legendary career.

Life really begins now for you sir, wish you all the best! Paperback Verified Purchase. It is actually pretty ordinary. I did not get anything substantially new that I have not read elsewhere, which is not saying much anyway. There are anecdotes right through the book. Some of which I enjoyed. Some of his early days in 80s made a good reading. Two things that I became more aware of were He got injured badly right through his career and that bothered him and he struggled with it.

Rather unfortunate or may be he was constantly pushing his body. That infamous declaration by Rahul which left him stranded is another example. Rahul should not have declared I did not know that Rahul delayed declaration in sydney test few months ago which may have robbed us of our first series win in aus but Sachin was livid even after 24 hours!!!

SRT just could not let it go that Rahul tried to send a tough message to Pak that India means business However bad that call was from Rahul. I just found that strange. Sachin loves his s and s. For some one with whom he has scored maximum runs with , lack of warmth towards Rahul is conspicuous. He has good words for his knocks but nothing more. Probably Rahul himself was reserved. Coming to cricket itself I was surprised as to how so many of his shots were played even before ball was delivered.

It was surprising to learn the amount of pre-meditation and out-smarting that goes on!!. This guy lived , breathed cricket - an ultimate Cricket Huccha. One person found this helpful. The book starts very well and it's refreshing to learn about some early days of one of the best sportsmen universally. However, the books becomes monotonous over the next few chapters with the theme pretty much revolving around individual matches and tours and their scorelines. There isn't much buildup to stories in any of the chapters so the lessons if that was the intent didn't come across strong and interesting.

The book does get better towards the end dealing with the final few years of his career. There are fewer stats and more story and depth around here. It was good to see some explanation from the man about his mental state and his journey towards "the decision".

You do feel sad once the book is over so it kind of scores some points there. I would definitely recommend this to all followers of cricket. Especially Tendulkar critics should give this one a chance. You may just become a little less harsh towards the man. As a Die hard Sachin fan, I had expected a lot from this book. There are a lot of things which met with the expectations and some which did not. Now - Sachin has been in the media and public limelight since his early career and a lot has been said, written and broadcast with regards to him.

Most of what this book does is go through all of the memorable moments all over again and brings up a lot of nostalgia, but does not give us a lot of information about Sachin as a person and his views. What me as a reader expected was a more behind the scenes information which is lacking the expectations which I had.

Some things which I was hoping for in the book: Even if Sachin was not involved or linked to anything, there would have been discussions in dressing room, practice sessions, etc. This book gives us an insight into Sachin as a person and his remarkable journey so far. I am just hoping there is a sequel to this book which would give us the information which so many of us were hoping for and still waiting.

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Danielle Hugh.

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Those in Peril. The World of Cycling According to G. Geraint Thomas. Into the Water. Paula Hawkins. More often than not, failure and sorrow are bigger teachers than success and happiness. You are a cricketer and sportsman. You are fortunate to be representing your country, and that is a great honour. But never forget that this too is just another chapter in the book.

How many years will you play sport? Twenty years; if you are very good, maybe even twenty-five years. Even by that yardstick, you will live the majority of your years outside the sphere of professional sport.

This clearly means that there is more to life than cricket. I am asking you, son, to keep a pleasant disposition and maintain a balanced nature. Do not allow success to breed arrogance in you. If you remain humble, people will give you love and respect even after you have finished with the game. Nov 16, Aniket Sharma rated it really liked it. The four star rating is pretty much solely due to that it is a Sachin book by Sachin Himself.

The book as such reads like a Journal - mostly a running commentary of matches although important, key matches and gets monotonous after a while. That is something, since all the matches mentioned are very key matches in Sachin's career and for any fan of Indian cricket, they hold considerable interest. Sachin's relations within his family, especially with his kids, with teammates, and the food He had The four star rating is pretty much solely due to that it is a Sachin book by Sachin Himself.

Sachin's relations within his family, especially with his kids, with teammates, and the food He had along the tours, besides personal anecdotes from some of the matches are broadly the highlights of the book. Where it lets down is in its non-controversial stand on most issues.

Match fixing is mentioned only in passing, barely a few pages are dedicated to the Monkeygate scandal. BCCI is held up in high esteem almost everywhere. Most surprisingly, Yuvraj Singh's struggle with cancer and Sachin's stint with the Parliament as a Rajya Sabha member do not find a mention in this book.

The book is still worth buying and reading, because it is Sachin after all. The pictures generously sprinkled within the book are a collector's delight. What strikes one throughout the book is the straightforward, uncomplicated approach that Sachin seems to have towards life. That alongwith the devotion towards family, the patriotism and the attention to the minutest details of the sport are the key impressions one takes away and keeps with oneself as one completes this book.

Fans of the master-blaster are treated to delightful strokes of not the bat but the pen as the batting legend discussed all aspects of his life that have not been shared previously. Beginning with his childhood, the memoir is a journey through the life of Sachin through twe Playing It My Way: Beginning with his childhood, the memoir is a journey through the life of Sachin through twenty-eight informative and insightful chapters, from the first time he lifted the bat to his last walk back to the pavilion, it is as much a memoir of Sachin as much as it is a history of cricket in India.

My Autobiography by Sachin Tendulkar with Boria Majumdar will be used to support two charitable causes: All the more reasons for fans to buy the book, if not for keepsake alone!

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Mar 14, Bharath rated it liked it. If you are Sachin Tendulkar fan as indeed most of us are - would of course, suggest this as a book to be read. It has good matter on his early playing days and remarkable commitment to the game over a remarkable and long career. There are details on virtually all major tournaments and big knocks. There are many touching passages when Sachin talks about his family, his grief at his father's demise, well wishes of family and friends, wife Anjali's sacrifices to ensure he can concentrate on his car If you are Sachin Tendulkar fan as indeed most of us are - would of course, suggest this as a book to be read.

There are many touching passages when Sachin talks about his family, his grief at his father's demise, well wishes of family and friends, wife Anjali's sacrifices to ensure he can concentrate on his career and his emotions on his retirement. He refers in very gracious terms to the all round support he received from all, as well as the elaborate and touching farewell for his last test in Mumbai which his entire family attended.

The book however could have been some much better though and here Sachin probably did not have enough support from his co-writer. There is too much of statistics which are in case available in the public domain. Sachin's learnings from previous cricketers finds almost no space except for references to Gavaskar. Many other topics which would have been good to read are absent such as - Rahul Dravid and VVS Laxman's retirement, Dhoni's lack of comfort with senior, the real issues during the time Greg Chappel was the coach, other players contributions in key wins finds sketchy mention, matching fixing, issues in team selection etc.

As I mentioned at the start however, as a fan, do read the book! Dec 14, Aseem rated it really liked it. Read with low expectations n you will love it!

Sachin Tendulkar Playing It My Way

It is for true Sachin fans who anyways remember Sachin's achievements n disappointments but would cherish them again coming straight from the master himself.. By the time I finished.. I was as choked as I was when I heard his farewell speech for the firs Read with low expectations n you will love it!

I was as choked as I was when I heard his farewell speech for the first time.. Sacchchin Sachchin!!! Dec 15, Vandita Verma rated it did not like it.

No doubt Sachin is one the greatest batsman the country has but the book disappointed in many ways.. I expected more and a magnanimous account of Sachin's life than what has been written in the book.. Nov 14, Subadesh rated it liked it. High on nostalgia.

But has only around 50 pages of fascinating stuff that we don't know already. Way too many pedestrian match summaries like Gavaskar's Sunny Days. Lousy descriptions of people.

Writing style amateurish and leaves a lot to be desired - really wish someone like Bhogle had co-authored. Still a page turner, like a patchy Sachin innings where we hang on to his every move no matter what - coz we can't have enough of him. Over to YouTube now: Nov 11, Mithraa Sriraman rated it liked it. Pales in comparison to out of my comfort zone.

Sep 02, Harish Challapalli rated it really liked it Shelves: Nov 06, Raksha Bhat rated it really liked it. When you read about someone who has made it big in life in his own words that too, there are always more than a hundred lessons to learn. Another thing I am glad about is that this book is one of the best gifts I have given myself on my birthday this year, pre ordering a copy was a good thing that I impulsively did.

It reached home on the release date itself, November 6th. Thank you Sachin for making my birthday a little more special! When I opened the book and saw the dedication: No autobiography can document every detail of the authors life as Sachin himself puts. It is quite bit obvious for someone who has played cricket close to quarter of a century to write about the little tricks and tips that helped him in his game.

The many cricket match details right from his first match to the last fortunately did not bore me, given my technical knowledge of the game is way too limited and cricket is not something which I am interested in.

I read this book with a completely different intention, to know Sachin not as a cricketer but as a person. This has wisely and rightly been avoided, for he has always let his game do all the talking he intended to. The book begins with anecdotes from his childhood, Sachin being a naughty child was one surprising revelation.

His bicycle, his love for Chinese food, his pranks in the neighborhood, his love for music, his naive adamancy, him watching John McEnroe play, him stealing mangoes, his relationship with his siblings, father and mother are wonderfully recalled. He had a complete Indian childhood, something we all can relate to. His one set of uniforms and wet pockets, crowded bus and train rides four times a day, rude comments from conductors that he took on his stride, his personal commitments as a son, husband or a father are things which we never saw on the field when we expected a century every time he came out to bat.

If one had to make a list of inspirational Indians for unwavering focus and constant practice Sachin has to be somewhere top in the list, a true Bharat Ratna at that.

He also writes about his fears like the first match jinx, him not able to give his complete best in certain situations in different tours throughout his career. Another interesting aspect is the Greg and Ian Chappell saga, brave of him to write about it now in his autobiography, if it was brought up back then it would have only lifted his stature more. Also he mentions about his little friction with Dravid over a declaration when he was at the score of , this is not very surprising, when there are stalwarts with their own strengths and ideas at the top of a sport in which players are idolized, there are bound to be differences and it is quite righteous of him to write about that.

His respect for Kumble is also worth mentioning, Anil according to him is one of the greatest players to have represented India, true that!

To say Sachin was not behind records it would be untrue, the frenzy the media and fans created for him was enough to boost his morale and raise his expectations for himself. The hundredth hundred in particular! For Sachin, his personal milestones were never before playing for India. For the records he was also the first batsman to be given out by a third umpire, call it luck on his side, good or bad!

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He also remembers the many Indian families who have made him and the Indian team feel at home in their part of world. He also writes about his fans like Sudhir Gautam and the many commoners who have helped him. Read his autobiography to know more, Sachin the person off the field!

Another important necessity to be successful is the support system that one has, a matter in which Sachin is blessed; right from his father, mother, brother, sister, coach, friends, wife and children.

Also when your heroes call and talk to you for forty five long minutes when you are down like how Vivian Richards did, or when they send 34 champagne bottles as a small gift on reaching their record like how Sunil Gavaskar did it says more about the person who is loved so much.

He writes that celebrations do not come naturally to him but when winning a World Cup- that moment when life seems complete, one deserves to! That was the most joyous Sachin I had ever seen on television! Nobody can deny that we miss watching him play today. Now for the things I have learnt from Sachin, I am extremely grateful for all the positivity I have gained from his words.

View all 6 comments. Jan 09, Divya rated it liked it Shelves: As a fairly crazy Tendulkar fan, I'd been meaning to read this book for a while but was slightly concerned about the size of the book as well as the lukewarm reviews I'd been seeing.

Turns out that the concerns were not misplaced. While I loved Sachin's fairly straightforward first-person intimate style of writing, it was interesting for about the first pages where he spoke about his childhood and growing up and learning.

What really started to bug me a little though, pretty soon, was his As a fairly crazy Tendulkar fan, I'd been meaning to read this book for a while but was slightly concerned about the size of the book as well as the lukewarm reviews I'd been seeing.

What really started to bug me a little though, pretty soon, was his constant admissions of "embarrassment" when he admitted to the slightest weakness and personal details though it was mostly because of the repetitiveness of that statement - Sachin is that way in real life and you forgive him easily for debut author mistakes and diplomacy. This sets the tone for the rest of the book where he touches on the big matches and his role in them and much lesser than fans would actually like on what went on behind the scenes even in his own head.

The book has a great record of all his statistics and scores, but during reading you tend to skip them if you want to read it as a story. The other part is that once you read match after match after match, you get a little tired unless you are watching the matches side by side, which may be a great future idea. As a story itself I really wish it was organized a little more about his personal growth and life, but there's only so much of it.

The parts that really felt intimate and a good look into the inner Sachin were his initial days with Anjali and later his feelings about captaincy. The latter especially adds a lot of color into his match stories but almost functions more as a clarification for some of the media furore over his performance.

I almost felt like, except for some sections in the book, the rest of the book shouldn't be read at one go, but rather in sections so you don't feel the monotony. In some ways I think I, like a lot of other people, was looking for the behind scenes, not just cricket match, version of Tendulkar. What really surprised me was the sheer number of injuries and treatment that went into the career of a cricketer and what Sachin needed to go through to play constantly for 24 years.

The other thing I would have loved to see was the emergence of Tendulkars's, the business and the motivation behind it and the post retirement phase or at least hints of it would have been great. I realize that this review has unfortunately been more about what else could have been there in the book rather than whats there, but that by itself tells me how I felt after reading close to a pages by Sachin.

Nov 09, Vinodh rated it liked it. I will start with the positives - which are few. The chapter on Anjali is a delight. The chapter on his captaincy has some good insights. So is his backing of Robin Singh, the move to shift Dravid and Ganguly to 3 and 5 respectively, the angst agains I will start with the positives - which are few.

So is his backing of Robin Singh, the move to shift Dravid and Ganguly to 3 and 5 respectively, the angst against the selection committee and a slight disgust against the BCCI on his sacking.

His irritation towards Dravid for the Multan declaration, and the Greg Chappell an easy target episode seem honest. But apart from this, it almost becomes a pain to read and even more so if you remember the matches. So much so that on one occasion he has convinced Dhoni and Gary to postpone a declaration to let Yuvraj and Gambhir, both in the 70s, to get their centuries.

They both got out without s but India won. Nevertheless, it is a recurring theme in his narrative when it comes to his centuries.

The man was obsessed with the number - for the good or bad. And his determination to play even when half fit also comes across as annoying. His injuries are well documented but so is his half baked, hurried up comebacks which may not have been in the best interests of the team.

Most of the recollections about important matches read like a match report anybody could write by just reading the scorecard. And the tour of England, when Ganguly and Dravid entered the scene, gets one page - a page where Nasser Hussain is mentioned as skipper! Typical Tendulkar! It is a very disappointing 'autobiography' which lacks a personal touch. It reads more like his career summarised by Boria Majumdar.

Nov 18, Nishit Ganatra rated it really liked it. I think unintentionally I was saving my first review on goodreads for this book. This is not just a book but a life of a great man.

No book can sum up an entire journey of 24 years of a life in less than pages. Nevertheless, this book made me nostalgic about how my childhood days were spent seeing this great man on TV. The career of Sachin speaks for itself and none of my words will do justice appreciating him. Hence I will talk anything but his career in this review.

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It is wonderful how Sac I think unintentionally I was saving my first review on goodreads for this book. It is wonderful how Sachin has grown in a close knit family both, before and after the marriage. The hardwork, importance of coaching, the sibling love, the camaraderie that he shared with his brother made it an awesome read. His love towards his wife, care for kids, respect for his parents and his guidance to his team mates will always be respected.

He has given us so many moments of pride being an Indian and arguably no one else can give the same amount of glory to India in cricketing world. All I have to say is, Sir, you might not believe it but cricket has become less interesting after you bidded adieu to the sport. The best thing that i found in this book is his candid admittance of the importance of his wife in his life, some of the moments where he freely resented the happenings on the cricket ground such as- when he was not allowed to score a double century even after having plenty of time in a test match making the readers believe that even God of cricket can be hurt emotionally and can be angered.

It was justified to get angry and we might not feel the same way but the pain can be felt. But the book is written with a view to keep aside all the controversies.

All the great things are talked about which I am not against of but writing less on match fixing and other controversies that always hovered over Indian cricket was expected in a way the kind of person he is, but also disappointed me a tad bit. The book is a page turner without any second thougts and will last long in a reader's mind.

But as always I wanted more from this legend and in no time I finished thia book just to wonder,what next from this man? You have earned love and respect of billions. Nov 12, Deepak Gopalakrishnan rated it really liked it. Sachin's autobiography, probably the most anticipated book in India in the last few years, is not groundbreaking, it's not overly controversial and doesn't tell us anything new about the legend who has been the subject of so much media exposure in the last two decades.

Despite that, PIMW is a lovely read. It's not so much an autobiography as much as a first person chronology of his career.

Which by itself is fascinating, because we've heard these stories so many times before, it's interesting to Sachin's autobiography, probably the most anticipated book in India in the last few years, is not groundbreaking, it's not overly controversial and doesn't tell us anything new about the legend who has been the subject of so much media exposure in the last two decades. Which by itself is fascinating, because we've heard these stories so many times before, it's interesting to hear it coming from him.

The beginning of the book is the best part.

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His childhood, anecdotes, his feelings It's a wonderful glimpse into how he felt about the game and really, how he was before he became a superstar. The rest of the book trudges on, really, and if you're well-versed with Indian cricket over the last two years, you could either be bored or thoroughly entertained if you consider it a sort of rewind session.

His prose is not the greatest, of course, but we'll grant him that. We're not looking for literary brilliance here.