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Madhorubhagan tamil novel pdf

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BOOKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR His Tamil novel 'Madhorubagan' came under family (in Tamil 'Madhorubhagan') has been a bestseller, having sold over. This passionate novel has become symbol of freedom of Tamil and then in a celebrated translation by Penguin India, Perumal Murugan's . family (in Tamil ' Madhorubhagan') has been a bestseller, having sold over , copies in India. download ebook madhorubhagan perumal murugan as pdf for free at the available here. hajj and umrah guide in tamil pdf novel because.

View 2 comments. It just takes you in its world and you can't help but get carried away by it. I would recommend this book to all those who love Indian literature, but with a warning to expect a bit of vulgarity and mealy mouthedness. Murugan has written with sheer brilliance about the double standards of society and how people ostracize others to hide their own frustrations. Murugavel Tamil. All opinions are my own, honest and come from the heart.

I respect the author for creating an imaginary story based on a holy festival's customs, but then again, not everyone holds that power to think beyond reality. The town that the author has portrayed in the story is very much real, even the temple of that god too, but the customs surrounding the chariot festival is fictional, and that have left the Indian culture in a bad light by being fictional. So talk about freedom of expression, I think that too is a myth! The author's writing style is extremely coherent rich with deep emotions and proper layers with depth that will make the readers easily comprehend with the plot as well as with the writing.

Now the translated edition of the book has some flaws, especially in the narrative, where the author uses the local dialect along with its translation right beside it and sometimes, the translation is missing all together, so that might be bit tricky for foreign or other regional readers to contemplate with the dialogues.

The story is narrated in so many layers and back stories that make it only enriching and thorough that will let the readers visually imagine the scenes right before their eyes.

The characters are crafted really well in this book, complete with their flaws and strong aspects that will only look believable in the eyes of the readers. The main characters, both Ponna and Kali are bold characters reflecting realism in their demeanor that will earn respect from the readers for their brave attitude and confronting the remarks and negative comments about their lives.

Ponna is depicted with freedom, sensuality not only in her body, but also in her soul, that gives her a fetching outlook. While Kali is a loyal husband with a funny bone in his system, who will lighten up the gloomy mood of the story almost all the time, yet this man too blindly obeys all the social and religious customs to remove his curses from the gods. Ponna is strong while Kali exists within her shadow.

Both are extremely striking characters and are bound to leave a lasting impression in the minds and the hearts of the readers. In short, this is one of the most captivating and though provoking tales that I have read in recent times, and with a lustrous writing style and exquisite and almost lyrical prose, it makes the story into something evocative and extremely satisfying to read.

Fine quality of Indian literature that we rarely come across these days. View all 5 comments. Indian Regional fiction lovers. Was a wonderful read. I love regional Indian literature which enables me to explore this vast, varied and beautiful country of mine, at my own pace, and in the comfort of my home. And I like it more, if the writing is crisp,taut as well as descriptive.

This book dealt with the subject of despair of childless couple, and how they have to cope up with society who feels they lack something. I have encountered the despair of childless couple in my professional life, and I know how devastating the nee Was a wonderful read.

I have encountered the despair of childless couple in my professional life, and I know how devastating the need for children can be, from personal as well as cultural and religious aspects. Kali and Ponna are the unfortunate couple in this book, who are forced to go to extremes to fulfil their desire, mainly to evade the taunts that come their way in their day to day lives.

This book neatly sums up the lives of Tamilian agricultural villagers; their beliefs, customs, traditions, way of life etc. The raw humanity, the rudeness and crudity, and the almost cruel customs will shock the unwary reader. But being an Indian, and being exposed to the Indian small town mentality, at least indirectly, I was not at all shocked or repelled. The vivid characters will remain with me for a long, long time to come.

I would recommend this book to all those who love Indian literature, but with a warning to expect a bit of vulgarity and mealy mouthedness. Perhaps this book not graphic, still a bit bothersome is better recommended to those in their mid twenties and above.

I don't want gullible young adults to be put off from their matrimonial ventures, if any. I really loved reading the vivid characterization and descriptions , but am confused about the time period of the story - is it before independence?

Just after independence? And why did not the couple approach even a single doctor? They may be villagers, but I am loathe to believe that they haven't heard of modern medicine. These questions are nagging me when I close this book and place it in my shelf.

View all 7 comments. I bought this book to show solidarity with the author after he was bullied by right wing elements and forced to apologise etc. So this was my statement for freedom of expression. And I am glad I did,else i would have missed reading a wonderful book: The prose is superb and I can only imagine how beautiful it must be in original tamil. The descriptions of the village and temples and festival crowds etc are superb..

The love of ponna and kali,their attraction to each other, their frustration at not being able to bear a child and their relationship with the village folk,family etc who constantly bring up their childlessness and alienate them from rituals and occasions because of this are all wonderfully written.

One can feel the pain of the couple who have to conform to whats acceptable in their society but are relegated to the fringes and made to feel inadequate over something they have no control over.

There is nothing controversial in it,no vulgarity and it is a window to a different world. Overall,its a very fast paced book and I would definitely recommend this book to everyone I know.

Nov 03, Vimal Thiagarajan rated it it was amazing Shelves: Easily one of the most poignant pieces of literature that I've ever read.

Thanks to the Madras High Court for lifting the ban on the Tamil version, though that doesn't do much reparation to the mental agonies the author had to undergo or to the unfortunate readers who might not see another novel from such a talented exponent of the language. But it at least put an end to my annoying 2-year wait to grab the Tamil version with the English version One Part Woman tantalizing me all the time to read Easily one of the most poignant pieces of literature that I've ever read.

But it at least put an end to my annoying 2-year wait to grab the Tamil version with the English version One Part Woman tantalizing me all the time to read it and at least get to know how the controversial subject matter had been treated. It was a singular reading experience that was both heartwarming and depressing at the same time, page after page, detail after incredible detail. The heartwarming parts had to do with the incredibly microscopic observation and description of how the rural folk of the s Gounders in this case lived off the land- the backbreaking labor involved in clearing rough unyielding terrain, their agricultural implements, mechanisms of seeding and harvesting, optimal utilization of organic fertilizers, crop rotation strategies in a rain-fed area ruled by the vagaries of nature, secret nooks in the woods to get far away from the madding crowd when the mind begs for escape, the level of care and intense thinking that went into animal husbandry and a whole host of other details regarding rural sustenance.

The depressing parts of course had to do with the subject matter - Kali and Ponna and their arduous struggle for progeny and the endless taunts and insinuations that come their way from a society that is obsessed with not leaving someone alone. This contrasting experience reminded me of something that I'd read recently - two contrasting sentiments about life in pre-independence Indian villages.

While Mahatma Gandhi celebrated village life and its morals and said "If the villages perish, India will perish too.

It will be no more India. Her own mission in the world will get lost", Dr B R Ambedkar said "What is a village — a sink of localism, a den of ignorance, narrow mindedness and communalism". Perumal Murugan's penmanship is endlessly fascinating. He was daring not just with the handling of a sensitive subject matter, but also with his digressing style of narration dotted with endless anecdotes and time-leaps which might put some readers off. Aside from the microscopic description of rural life, he also posseses a remarkably nuanced understanding of the emotional side of his characters.

His portrayal of the degree of passion,chemistry and love that binds the lead characters evokes an emotion that is somewhere between wonder and envy.

Though he leaves no room for abstraction in his vivid detailing of rural life, his prose is abundantly laced with layers of deep poetic abstraction. His Gounder and Chakkili characters borrow from his vast compendium of Kongu Tamil words and dialects which made for a pleasingly authentic read.

An incredibly nuanced tale told with nonchalant poetic ease! View all 8 comments. It is said a man is a social animal. The moment the man believed it, he became a slave to the very society imperceptibly he is a part.

Society placed the rules, he followed. The society built the civilizations, he ruled. The whole time he forgot that he made the society. If society is water he is the bowl that containing it. So he, only, holds the power to change a society's discourse. But in course of time, Man let society rule him. This is where One Part Woman started. One Part Woman is about It is said a man is a social animal. One Part Woman is about a village couple, Kali and Ponna.

Married for 12 years, they have no children. Their inability to conceive a child made them first useless then helpless. And they became the victims of the tragedy that was bound to happen.

Society taunted them being barren, humiliated them, shunned them deliberately up to such a level that they inadvertently believed they have to be approved by the society to live a life. What the author, Perumal Murugesan did is what a free man is doing from the birth of society. Does a man need to be approved by a society? For that, the author is brandished as a culprit as his protagonists were made social-outcasts in the story.

Protests happened against the author and his books were banned. View 2 comments. Their only qualm is that they are unable to conceive, and this calls for taunts from the whole village and the society, especially for Poona, who is constantly finding herself in embarrassing and humiliating situations because of this fact.

Over "There is no female without the male and no male without the female. Over the years they have prayed to every god, offered alms to every deity, performed every odd ritual, but to no effect. All of their hopes rest on a single night of the chariot festival, where the rules are relaxed and a consensual relationship between a man and a woman is allowed.

What will come out of the night of the union? How will it effect Poona's and Kali's relationship? The characters are very well drawn, the story is really gripping and you feel one with the trauma of the two souls trying to fight the taunts of the society, all the while not losing their love for each other. I would highly recommend this to people interested in Indian Literature. While I have heard high praises about the original, I am not sure if I could have digested the rawness in the story.

There are a lot of racial and sexual slurs more than other novels of the Read the full review at Elgee Writes Though initially written in my mother tongue Tamil, I read One Part Woman in English and I am glad I did that. There are a lot of racial and sexual slurs more than other novels of the genre though , but nothing that called for the riots and calls for banning the book.

I think the political and casteists should leave the literary world alone. Things that worked for me: I loved the layered and flowery writing style of the author. All the characters are well thought and fully developed. The book ends in a kinda cliffhanger and continues in the next part, the end worked for me.

The rural life in the south India is perfectly etched. The rawness in writing goes in hand with a lot obscene sexual and racial slurs. There are times the flowery writing might seem overdone and drags the pace. If you want to read a translated work that portrays rural south India then One Part Woman should be your choice. I am definitely reading the part two soon. Blog Facebook Twitter Amazon Jan 22, Shanmugam rated it it was ok. View all 6 comments. Of all the books I've read so far, I guess this one will be the closest to my heart and stay with me the longest.

Not only because it is the most intimate and greatest love story ever written IMO, but also because I lived and loved and panicked and raged and cried and laughed with these characters. For the odd pages across which these 3 books stretch, this book was my home. It taught me everything I wanted to know about the human condition, and how beautiful and despicable humans can get. Be Of all the books I've read so far, I guess this one will be the closest to my heart and stay with me the longest.

Beautiful language, masterful storytelling, clever turns of phrase, REAL characters - these books have got them all. It also has some mysterious, elusive quality that I'm unable to pin down that makes it so endearing to me and fills my heart with love and sorrow. I want to write a longer, proper review extolling all the plentiful virtues of this book. But I'll refrain because I know words are gonna be useless. It's infuriating that in a land of 6 crore Tamil people, not more than 10 thousand have read this treasure and that is a very generous assumption.

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We are a useless, ignorant, philistine population that deserves to rot in insidious television and mindless masala movies. I'm almost glad about the controversy sparked by those imbeciles because otherwise this book wouldn't have gotten the limelight it deserves. And I wonder how many such gems sparkle in forgotten corners of Tamil literature, unbeknownst to us hungry readers because there was no buzz surrounding them. An enjoyable, involving novel, on the classic novelist's fare of individuals squeezed and pressured by the community they live in.

Kali and Ponna aren't allowed to be happy; expectations are that they must have children, which doesn't happen; slowly this single issue throttles their lives. Often the neighbours don't even mean to be cruel, or advert to That Issue; but the wife Ponna grows more and more sensitive on it and cannot stop herself lashing back at people, which digs her hole deeper; whil An enjoyable, involving novel, on the classic novelist's fare of individuals squeezed and pressured by the community they live in.

Often the neighbours don't even mean to be cruel, or advert to That Issue; but the wife Ponna grows more and more sensitive on it and cannot stop herself lashing back at people, which digs her hole deeper; while the very likeable husband Kali has to negotiate well-meant suggestions from the family.

It's sad but there's real humour, notably from Uncle Nallupayyan who takes a contrary stance and manages to be let alone as the local crazy person, by talking outrageously at a village adjudication. Muthu, Ponna's brother and Kali's childhood friend, has his own escape from society in several cleverly hidden camp-outs in the forest. I did wish for a glossary.

People address each other by affectionate or kinship terms -- the translation of which usually emerges, but those of us unfamiliar might want aid. It was easy to read, however. The title is a title of the god, part-male, part-female.

Novel madhorubhagan pdf tamil

Wonderful settings and portrait of daily lives. No wonder this book got Murugan in trouble! An absolutely brilliant attempt to bring out the hypocrisies of the society. I am utterly confused by how to respond and I feel as though I should take a few days to reassess my intelligence after reading this. Every single one of my friends gave this five stars with long complex reviews and I just assumed this would be life altering.

But I felt the whole time like I was trying to poke into the characters and the plot with a toothpick, and I needed a sword. The biggest issue I had getting into it was that it felt like one second I was reading something intentionally cont I am utterly confused by how to respond and I feel as though I should take a few days to reassess my intelligence after reading this.

The biggest issue I had getting into it was that it felt like one second I was reading something intentionally contemporary and then the next it felt like ancient mythology I now understand why. Yeah, I completely forgot I was reading a translation. However, and I think this says more about the book than the experience I had while reading it, there are images from the novel that were so beautiful that they have imprinted themselves on my mind.

It felt so peaceful. The controversies shrouding this book, hurting people's sentiment, women, caste and religion at large, so many debates in media, and not much support from expected quarter, were the only reason I was intrigued by this book. It would have been lovely reading it in Tamil, but I really couldn't wait any longer. Also, if it had the local slang, it would have been difficult to understand. Luckily, reading it in English, made it a quick read.

I rather found it as a take on the society at large, not any The controversies shrouding this book, hurting people's sentiment, women, caste and religion at large, so many debates in media, and not much support from expected quarter, were the only reason I was intrigued by this book. I rather found it as a take on the society at large, not any particular group or people, our insensitive comments, teases, jokes and ideas, magnifying the imperfections of people around us, while, we do not even bother to better our own selves Vyasa- Ambika-Ambalika.

What better way to make a book popular than to demand a ban on it. This isn't a book that I would have picked up if it hadn't been for the whole controversy around it. I'm not sure whether I got the sanitised version or the original 'scandalous' version of the book. I would have loved to read it in Tamil, but it would have taken me much longer to finish the book and my curiosity got the better of me. But the translation is quite good. And since those of us from Ta tl;dr: And since those of us from Tamilnadu can relate to the overall setup, it worked for me.

Note to self: Stop picturing every book you read as a movie these days Kali and Ponnayi are a childless couple living in a society where the taunts, insults and innuendos are free flowing. Help and advice comes in many forms to them, some well intentioned, some plain sadistic. Ponna is made to drink bitter infusions made with neem leaves that are handed to her by an 'auspicious' widow. Isn't neem a contraceptive? She has men making not-so-subtle suggestions offering their services.

She does a Fear Factor level walk on a dangerous rock near a temple to bribe the gods. She is deemed unfit for motherhood because she found the stink of a baby's feces repulsive. Surprisingly, she isn't the only one to be 'blamed' here.

Though Kali is constantly under the pressure to take a second wife, he is also equally taunted for his 'impotence'. He has everyone from cousins to random neighbours hoping to dip their fingers into his heirless property after his death.

More than his love for Ponna, it is the fear of confirming this impotence that doesn't allow him to marry again.

மாதொருபாகன் [Madhorubhagan] by Perumal Murugan

Afterall, it is his ancestors who raped a tribal girl and incurred her curse. It is a difficult life being childless in such a society in that era. Any society in any era actually.

So what does one do when the gods want more than rooster blood and arrack? What does one do when the gods want more than a dangerous walk around their temple? What does one do when the gods want more than your prayers? You have to look beyond god. You have to look at man. Another man. Do it with him thinking of him as god. Kunti did that, Madri did that. Oh wait. That was vice versa. But anyway. Apparently, the results are guaranteed here. And this is what Ponna's mother and mother-in-law finally suggest.

Does she do it? On the fourteenth day of the temple festival, that day when all married women above thirty get the sanction of the gods to lay with random strangers and bring forth 'god's children' into the world. Does she manage to look beyond the face of her husband, look beyond her fears, look beyond society's taunts and find a god to do it with?

Since I was waiting for the 'controversial' part, I did not take the time to savour the book as much I should have. The narration went back and forth a lot, sometimes confusing. Characters like the bachelor uncle Nallupayyan who gave the whole drama the much needed sane voice and Muthu, Ponna's brother, who took Kali to the same temple festival years ago to 'offer their services' give you an insight on the hypocrisy of it all. Small but sharp references to the caste equations in that society add a dash of sting.

During the build up to the climax, when Ponna sits in the cart looking at the Chakkli man's baby with so much longing, I hoped that the story would take a more 'scandalous' twist. But I was disappointed. A good book. Not a great book, and in my opinion it was not a shocking book.

But a good book, so read it. If not for anything else, atleast for the sake of supporting freedom of expression. Because is a thing these days. That is how my two babies were born' I just remembered someone tweeting that long ago. Unrelated to this book, but the thought just crossed my mind. View 1 comment. Jun 01, Pechi rated it it was amazing. Now, this is true historic fiction. Not the likes of Ponniyin Selvan. Meticulously well-researched, amazingly written and splendidly rich with layers of poetic imagery, philosophy, and raw emotions, Madhorubagan is one of a kind.

It is one of those rare novels that sustain your attention with suspense so torturous that it makes you impatiently rush through the whole book to the ultimate revelation in the very last paragraph.

Or do all love stories follow the same pattern?

Pdf novel madhorubhagan tamil

As you might probably be aware already, Madhorubhagan is the story of a childless couple living in rural India somewhere between the s and s. It hardly matters. At least in rural India. Perumal Murugan clearly portrays the POVs of every character without dwelling too much on dull introspection.

My favorite thing about Madhorubhagan was the amazing chemistry between Kaali and Ponna.

Even their smallest intimacies are written with great taste. After a breezy first half rich with romance, Perumal Murugan drops the bomb exactly at the middle! If you know Tamil, I strongly suggest you read the original book.

Novel pdf tamil madhorubhagan

Though One Part Woman is well-translated, it is impossible to feel the raw emotions that Madhorubhagan evokes in a translated version. There is a lot of beauty lost in translation. I tried reading One Part Woman after finishing Madhorubhagan and found it grossly underwhelming.

Several friends have reviewed this novel and their overall sentiment seems to be that there are flaws, both in the writer's gaze and in the translation. A friend has read it in the original Tamil and written about how the novel seems to float along on the surface, not going deep enough.

Confronted by these viewpoints, I'm inclined to nod my head at the criticisms, most of which seem valid enough. I'll add one of mine for good measure: Kali's visceral? I should have been moved.

I wasn't. This could have been something that was lost in translation, I don't know. But, and here's my defence of Perumal Murugan: For the most part, the novel had me hooked. With descriptions of rural life in the Tamil country, with the food, with the almost naturalist-like cataloging of the flora, the writer's portrait is true, his brush-strokes firm.

The story is a simple one and to sustain it enough to tell you more about the melee it takes place in is what makes this novel engrossing. The characters are few and you don't learn about them through intimate studies; you know them by what they do or by their responses to what happens to them. The acid-tongued Ponna, the hard-working Kali, the finder-of-nooks Muthu: We know all of them this way. One Part Woman has me intrigued and fascinated enough to read the rest of Perumal Murugan's work.

Perhaps then I can understand completely the Kongunadu in his head. Jan 20, WordsBeyondBorders rated it really liked it. The original book is about pages, and this version is I peaked at other reviews of this book on Goodreads, because the book got a lot of glowing 5 star reviews and I just couldn't understand why. But now I know that the translation is the reason. The original, Madhorubdagan , is poetic, lush and beautiful. One Part Woman is dry, choppy and repetitive.

Which saddens me to no end, because I don't speak the language the book was written in, so I guess I will never be able to experience the true beauty of it. I loved the new cover, I loved the topic and I loved that I had the chance to read something by a foreign author.

I wanted to learn more about Indian culture, their religion and customs, but due to the horrible translation I really couldn't. There were no explanations of temples, or rituals - names were just thrown around and I drowned trying to decipher what means what.

I also really hope that this book is not a correct representation of Indian culture as a whole and its people. Because if it is you will be hard pressed to find one single nice person in India, which I'm sure is not true. In the book they all were just horrible people! Jealous, crude, self-centered and worse. The only person I felt bad for was Ponna, because not only she suffered the most, but also because Kali in my opinion was a total prick. I firmly believe that if book gets translated it should be translated in a way that is the closest to the original, but also in a way that is accessible and understandable to everyone.

People who live in that environment and people who don't should all be able to experience the book in the same way. Otherwise why translate it at all?

All opinions are my own, honest and come from the heart. Oct 24, Sangeetha Ramachandran rated it really liked it Shelves: A review of its translated version urged me to pick this book.

While googling about it, the controversies it created, the author deciding to quit writing after its ban were what appeared in front of me at first. I started reading this one with so many thoughts in mind. This Tamil novel, published about four year ago talks about a ritual that existed decades ago in tradition.

The story hails from Tamil culture of decades ago in which era the institution of marriage demanded child. OK if you think A review of its translated version urged me to pick this book. OK if you think even today it is true, read ahead! It is a depiction how the society was once and centered around a couple Kali and Ponna who weren't able to meet the expectations of the society by bearing a child.

Except for a child, the couple were happy having each other, loving each other the same for twelve long years. This book talks about how cruel the society could be when it comes to a childless couple. We know, "People talk.

That's what they do". It is that to which extend their incautious and heartless comments push the couple desperately wanting to have a child. The couple being ready to whatever it takes to bear a child, does everything to please the Gods so meticulously that they were afraid that even a single hint of doubt in the rituals would affect the results it would bring.

For all the rituals they were undergoing, Kali worries more about her wife's physical and mental health. In all the instances possible, the author shows the love they both share. How pure their love is! Finally they ended up with falling into trap of the society! With the current scenario, it is hard to imagine the things the couple had undergone but I could feel that their sufferings then were exact and author hadn't exaggerated a little bit.

Such an involving read with the characters and incidents quoted stay with you even after you finished the book. Detailed research that had been done on the rural and agricultural parts! I just adored the slang and the jokes which have their own beauty. The story starts with the beautiful description of Portia flower Poovarasam poo and with a few initial passages the author made me feel guilty for not reading my own language enough.

Throughout the book, I had so much to co-relate even though I'm not from the same region. These made me learn more about these old wives' tales and I discussed a lot about these with people around.

That's how restive I was throughout the days I read this one. It sums up everything about the regional Tamil culture and mindset of people.

Reading books in your mother tongue is a great pleasure even though the vulgarity of the language is very high and in some places it made me grimace. Being the one who takes pride in my mother tongue for its lavishness, I found this book so intimidating with its rich vocabulary.

I found every phrase of this poignant and moving. Sad that I picked up this book only after reading reviews of its translated work. This is one such book which should have been celebrated by every fan of Tamil literature for the work done by the author in bringing such a good historical fiction.

For having chosen a sensitive topic it was dogged by controversies. What other items do customers buy after viewing this item? Sila Nerangalil Sila Manidhargal. Oru Porularathara Adiyalin Vakumulam. John Perkins translated by Era. Murugavel Tamil. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a product review. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Verified Purchase.

Author has portrayed the pain of the childless couple and the issues they face in their daily life, in a very detailed manner.

மாதொருபாகன் [Madhorubhagan]

What I liked the most? The portrayal of the husband being pushed into such painful situation. One person found this helpful. Author's mastery over Tamil is truly mesmerising. He takes to the bygone era. Plight of childless couple has been portrayed realistically. Highly lovable book Full-fledged enter into that world Great writer Interesting novel. Nice book. Very good informative book. See all 26 reviews.

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