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Drugs without the hot air pdf

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Drugs without the hot air: A proper assessment of drug harms and http://www. soundofheaven.info Drugs Without the Hot Air - Minimising the harms of legal and illegal drugs. Format: PDF BIC Code: JFFH1, PS, PSAN BISAC Code: MED, MED “Drugs Without the Hot Air”. As part of its Scarman Lecture Series, the Department of Criminology presents, in association with the Foundation.


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"David Nutt is one of those rare scientists with a dual talent for making the complex accessible and for telling a great story. The result is so much more than a. Titles like Sustainable Energy Without the Hot Air and Sustainable Materials From his discussion of legal drugs, Nutt moves on to factual. Drugs Without the Hot Air book. Read 72 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Winner of:Transmission Prize for the Communication of Ide.

I found it to be seriously comprehensive, fascinating and at times humorous. All drugs can potentially cause harm as well as pleasure. Vanilla is good on stewed fruit but Hazelnut UIT Cambridge Ltd. If you do use drugs, make sure they don't interfere with your schoolwork. But if he was to synthesize a drug that produced an identical high to alcohol, without producing any of the harms, it would almost certainly be banned and those involved in producing, selling and taking it would be criminalised.

Broadening the scope of the discussion, a framework is explored for formulating national drug policies that will minimize a myriad of harms—social, medical, criminal, financial, and environmental. Reviews "David Nutt is one of those rare scientists with a dual talent for making the complex accessible and for telling a great story. The result is so much more than a cornucopia of information and evidence about drugs, it's also a thoroughly engaging read.

Cambridge's UIT Press has established a well-deserved reputation for publishing clear, engaging, evidence-based books on controversial subjects. Like the other writers in the series, Nutt is both committed to rigorous, evidence-based policy and to clear, no-nonsense prose that makes complex subjects comprehensible. With this in mind, it is of tremendous enthusiasm that we welcome Professor Nutt's book: Drugs Without the Hot Air.

But this isn't about marijuana, or any drug in particular. But if he was to synthesize a drug that produced an identical high to alcohol, without producing any of the harms, it would almost certainly be banned and those involved in producing, selling and taking it would be criminalised. We ban drugs because they are harmful and we know they are harmful because they are banned.

Drugs that we don't ban -- tobacco, alcohol -- are "harmful" too, but not in the same way as the drugs that are banned, and we can tell that they are different because they haven't been banned. Nutt has choice words for the alcohol and tobacco industries, who often frame their activity as being supported by responsible choice, and claim that they only want to promote that sort of responsibility.

Nutt compares the alcohol industry's self-regulated responsible drinking campaigns to a campaign that exposed students in East Sussex to factual information about the industry's corruption of public health messages, its ferocious lobbying efforts, and the cost of drinking to wider society.

It turns out that exposing alcohol industry sleaze is vastly more effective at discouraging student drinking than anything sponsored by the industry itself.

Each chapter is a bracing, brisk, no-nonsense inventory of what harms and benefits arise from each substance, the history of their regulation, and the ways in which changes to the means of taking the drugs changes the outcome. Laid out like this, it's easy to see that prohibition isn't ever the right answer -- not for science, not for society, not for justice, and not for health.

There's also a sense of the awful, tragic loss to society arising from the criminalization of promising drugs. The book closes with the War on Drugs, and the worlds' governments own frank assessments of the unmitigated disaster created by Richard Nixon's idiotic decision 40 years ago.

Nutt analyzes the fact that policymakers know that the War on Drugs is worse than the drugs themselves by a long shot , but are politically incapable of doing anything about it, not least because politicians on all sides stand poised to condemn their opponents for being "soft on drugs.

After this, there is a frank chapter on talking with your children about drugs. Nutt is a parent and has some regrets about how he approached the subject with his own children one of his sons was stalked by a British tabloid journalist, who tricked him into friending him on Facebook, which gave the journalist the opportunity to gank photos of the young man smoking marijuana. As a parent, this stuff really resonated with me -- sensible advice that focuses on establishing and maintaining trust. A little knowledge to misquote Pope is a dangerous thing and most teenagers who try drugs are at best only partly informed.

If they might be tempted by illicit drugs a little truth-telling from someone who knows and cares might help. Knowledge is empowering. I'm not a particular fan of drug use but I don't regard people who intentionally take things, whether beer, whisky or mephedrone, to make them feel better, are criminals.

If you don't want to read the book here are 11 things you might want to tell your children anyway: Alcohol and tobacco are drugs and dangerous ones at that. All drugs can potentially cause harm as well as pleasure. Start telling your kids about drugs from an early age and be prepared to discuss your drinking and smoking with them. Never inject!!! Don't use solvents 6. Don't take drink and drugs at the same time.

A criminal record could ruin your career.

Drugs Without the Hot Air: Minimizing the Harms of Legal and Illegal Drugs

Find good sources of advice. If you do take drugs including alcohol and tobacco be clear why you are doing it.

Without the pdf drugs hot air

If you get into trouble with drugs get help quickly. If you do use drugs, make sure they don't interfere with your schoolwork. Aug 02, Travis rated it it was amazing. The book is more of an overview, but it's an excellent overview. This book provides a no-nonsense assessment of our current knowledge about the spectrum of drugs that humans use, and yes, alcohol and tobacco are definitely on that list, not in their own special c 'Drugs Without the Hot Air' should be required reading for parents, teachers, and, perhaps most importantly, politicians who are making the ridiculous, ineffective laws that are fueling, not stopping, the worldwide issues surround drugs.

This book provides a no-nonsense assessment of our current knowledge about the spectrum of drugs that humans use, and yes, alcohol and tobacco are definitely on that list, not in their own special category. Each drug has a breakdown of its possible positive and negatives, including physical, as well as societal impacts. For example, tobacco has little societal downside, but you have a greatly increased chance of dying from lung cancer.

And if you're caught? Jail time, and a record that will follow you for life. Very few physical downsides, if any. There are some very interesting chapters on just about every aspect of drugs. The book even offers some solutions, and mostly not pie in the sky solutions, but ones that are working right now.

Read this book now. We need more informed voters who can tip the tide for laws that make more sense and don't criminalize addicts.

And it's a lot cheaper, as our prisons won't be chock full of people that should probably get a helping hand, not bars and handcuffs.

UIT Cambridge - Drugs Without the Hot Air

Mar 05, Ozy Frantz rated it it was amazing Shelves: A very good, evidence-based review of the ways in which modern drug policy is irrational. Nutt has ranked many commonly taken drugs by how much harm they cause. The five most dangerous are alcohol, heroin, crack, methamphetamine, and cocaine; the five least dangerous are ecstasy, khat, LSD, buprenorphine, and mushrooms.

Without pdf drugs air the hot

Unfortunately, it was unclear whether he controlled for number of users, which makes an otherwise interesting and informative chapter marred by a possible methodological flaw. He A very good, evidence-based review of the ways in which modern drug policy is irrational. He also does not give a chart of which specific risks are associated with each drug, which would be very informative to potential users. Nutt's suggested regulation of alcohol was very interesting to me: In addition to the psychological benefits, LSD trips may enhance creativity for many people: From reading this book, I updated in the direction that LSD should be more widely available.

The book concludes with an evidence-based talk to give to your children on drugs, which goes as follows: Nov 12, Laura Shrum rated it really liked it. If you want a scientific and unbiased opinion on drugs and drug policy read this book. Actually since drugs impact all our lives in one way or the other I'd highly recommend reading this book.

David Nutt breaks down the hypocrisy, the science, the actual health consequences and the political mess that surrounds drug policy in the UK, and wider world. I have a degree in public health so have decent knowledge on drug policy and learned loads from this book. To be fair it is written a bit like a te If you want a scientific and unbiased opinion on drugs and drug policy read this book. To be fair it is written a bit like a textbook, but the information is worth the lack of storytelling.

If you need some facts to back up that discussion with your kid about drugs. And yes, alcohol statistically does more damage to society and has a higher financial burden to health care systems! Feb 22, Owen Daniel rated it it was amazing Shelves: Amazing book, ram-jammed full of facts, stats and logic.

A book to be ignored by those in power for the foreseeable future I do not doubt. We live in hope that one day our archaic drug legislation may be based on science, harm-reduction, and research, rather than emotional political whims. A must read for anyone vaguely interested in the subject - or the ludicrous laws that surround it. Nov 10, Oliver rated it it was amazing.

A UK-oriented guide to all things drugs. I found it to be seriously comprehensive, fascinating and at times humorous. The chapters were well divided and I liked that the author didn't hold back on his personal views towards the end of each chapter, which prevented it from becoming a dry fact-overloaded book and turned it into a perspective-shifter. Highly recommend!

Feb 21, Peter rated it it was amazing. Clear, mature, informative, but without the hyperbole- highly recommended to anyone who is curious, bewildered, or prejudiced about drugs. If only our Government was rational and adult enough to deal with this subject in the right way. Oct 20, Nicole rated it really liked it Shelves: Everyone should read this book.

There is a lot to digest, only legally in a field, Chapter The book leaves me with a more balanced view of drugs. Sep 29, Gyrodragon23 rated it really liked it. Interesting book with really good facts. Can get a little tiresome to get thru at times, but overall a very good intriguing read.

Jan 27, Craig rated it really liked it Shelves: Great overview of drugs and society and suggests some good ways to improve the system and stop the war on drugs that is failing. Jul 10, Micheala O'sullivan rated it it was amazing.

Drugs Without the Hot Air

Dec 11, Dave Potter rated it it was ok. Ironically I found that there was too much hot air in this one. Jul 21, Ender rated it it was amazing Shelves: Absolutely essential reading, for everyone. Dec 14, Savvas Katseas rated it it was amazing Shelves: Aug 20, Eddie rated it really liked it.

There are always newspaper stories about drugs in the UK and many of them carry a judgemental tone. David Nutt has written a factual book about recreational drugs based on evidence rather than sentimentality. The book discusses what drugs are, how they work, different types of drugs, the nature of addiction and the most controversial part is the evidence on the relative harm that they do. It is interesting look at how far science should dictate public policy.

Nutt was sacked from the government a There are always newspaper stories about drugs in the UK and many of them carry a judgemental tone. Nutt was sacked from the government advisory council on the misuse of drugs in because of his pubic view on certain drugs like cannabis. He is well known for presenting evidence that horse-riding is more dangerous than taking ecstasy. To start with he describes how drugs work and what they are. They have an effect similar to our natural neurotransmitters and Nutt describes a typical day without drugs for example what happens when we wake up,get stressed, are hungry and feel tired.

Then how drugs have evolved. Plants, where the drugs come from, have developed chemicals in their leaves that deterred insects that fed on them.

The purpose of those chemicals was to act on the insects neurological systems and confuse them. We know this because MRI imaging has greatly improved our understanding of neurotransmitters.

There are four main types of drugs that are taken for pleasure opioids, stimulants, depressants and psychedelics and Nutt describes them in more detail.