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Culture shock pdf

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Later definitions emphasize psychological explanation. • Adler writes that “culture shock is primarily a set of emotional reactions to the loss of perceptual. Culture shock adaptation strategies. Rubén Darío Alves López y Alicia de la Peña Portero. Universidad Nebrija Centro de Estudios Hispánicos. The 4 Stages of Culture Shock. Honeymoon Stage. This is usually during the first few days or weeks. People experience emotions like excitement, euphoria.


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Displacement Anxiety, or Culture Shock, "the anxiety that results from losing all our Kalvervo Oberg, one of the earliest researchers on culture shock, notes that . PDF | Provides guidelines for managing cultural shock (CS) using strategies that foster awareness, learning, and adaptation. Two approaches. CULTURE SHOCK More and more students nowadays go abroad hoping to learn about other people and other countries. Moreover, there are an increasing .

What happens to people who experience culture shock? Some people may just feel uneasy, uncomfortable or even less understood; others, however, experience very strong emotions and even go through a period of deep depression. What is important, however, is that culture shock is temporary. This is why the adjustment stage is often seen as a transitional stage of the culture shock. SOC term paper. Therefore, when people enter a foreign country and notice that all they are familiar with does not exist there, they tend to become anxious and even frustrated. Moreover, the intensity of that experience may differ depending on whether a person is alone or with somebody, even on whether a person is male or female.

In trying to understand what people experiencing culture shock go through, I conducted a small-scale research. Namely, I interviewed four people form the United States, all of different background, asking them about their experience in Serbia.

All interviews were individual and none of my interviewees has ever met one another. Three of my interviewees have left Serbia, except K.

Two of my interviewees, S. O are college students. Before that, S. This was his first stay abroad for such a long time and without his family. My other two interviewees, K. R came to Serbia to work. Like my other interviewees, this was K. She had visited some of the US neighboring countries as a high school student. Finally, C. Before coming to Serbia, she had been to other European countries doing a similar type of work.

After analyzing my research, I realized that there is no person who does not experience culture shock, it is just the intensity of what they experience that differs. In my analysis I will try to identify the stages in their stories and what emotions they exhibited in each stage. As previously mentioned, culture shock consists of four phases, the first one being the honeymoon stage. This stage may last from few weeks to six months depending on the circumstances.

There are different manifestations of this stage. In the beginning individuals may feel tired or little sad. My family and I were on a new adventure and were excited to experience a new culture and life. In another sense, it was very difficult for me because I did not know the language, I did not know how to shop, I did not know how to take my children to the doctor, and I did not know anything.

I had days that were very difficult! The first night we arrived in Serbia, it was January 9.

Pdf culture shock

There was snow on the ground and it was VERY cold which was very different from the climate we were coming from. My 4 year old daughter was very upset and NOT one of our 15 suitcases arrived with us on the plane.

That night, as we lay in bed, I could not sleep However, usually, people are fascinated by the new and they are very excited to learn about the culture and people and become a part of the community.

I was surprised by how European it seemed. Moreover, they might be enjoying increased material comfort, may feel proud that they can make themselves understood, and understand the natives, in their own language. Even learning some basic courtesies — please, thank you — helped me feel less out of place.

If people stay in the host country for a period of time longer than a month or so, they enter the second stage of culture shock known as the conflict stage. It is characterized by a hostile and aggressive attitude towards the host country.

People in the conflict phase may feel tired, sick, depressed, even frustrated and angry. That night, as we lay in bed, I could not sleep However, usually, people are fascinated by the new and they are very excited to learn about the culture and people and become a part of the community.

I was surprised by how European it seemed. Moreover, they might be enjoying increased material comfort, may feel proud that they can make themselves understood, and understand the natives, in their own language. Even learning some basic courtesies — please, thank you — helped me feel less out of place. If people stay in the host country for a period of time longer than a month or so, they enter the second stage of culture shock known as the conflict stage.

It is characterized by a hostile and aggressive attitude towards the host country. People in the conflict phase may feel tired, sick, depressed, even frustrated and angry.

In Serbia, people are accustomed to plans changing at the last minute, and everyone sort of shrugs and moves on. When I first arrived, I expected every meeting to begin and end on time, I expected the university to be open when I needed it, and I expected the computers to always work. Therefore, they must be insensible and unsympathetic to you and your worries. Furthermore, the language barrier might increase the uneasiness one feels in the host country. However, one of the important characteristics of the conflict stage is its intensity.

This means that not everyone feels the same intensity of emotions when going through this stage. Some people may just feel uneasy, uncomfortable or even less understood; others, however, experience very strong emotions and even go through a period of deep depression. My research has shown that people experience the conflict stage mostly around some holidays and important dates.

Shock pdf culture

The reason for this is that I know it is VERY difficult for my family to be away from us and our children during those times. This leads us to the third stage of culture shock known as the adjustment stage.

In this stage, people still experiences difficulties, but they are determined to finish what they have started. However, there is no a clear distinction between this stage and the ones proceeding and following it.

Therefore, a person either falls back on some characteristics of the conflict stage, thus staying it that stage slightly longer or goes on to the next stage. This is why the adjustment stage is often seen as a transitional stage of the culture shock. Finally, we come to the last stage of culture shock, the mastery stage.

This stage is characterized by the increasing understanding of why members of the host culture do what they do. A person in the mastery stage feels like a part of the community and develops a greater tolerance for what is strange and new in the host culture. Being in the last stage of culture shock means not only getting used to food, drinks and customs, but enjoying these things and missing them once a person goes back home.

Everything felt normal. I was in a good medium. Having reached the mastery stage, a person can start enjoying life in the host culture and gain a very valuable life experience. In conclusion, culture shock is a process people go through when faced with unfamiliar surroundings, exclusively somewhere out of their country.

There are four stages of culture shock: Moreover, even though every person goes through culture shock, the intensity of culture shock might not be the same. My research has shown that my interviewees went through all four phases, but their experience greatly differs. Furthermore, Z. After analyzing my research, I realized that there is no person who does not experience culture shock, it is just the intensity of what they experience that differs.

In my analysis I will try to identify the stages in their stories and what emotions they exhibited in each stage. As previously mentioned, culture shock consists of four phases, the first one being the honeymoon stage. This stage may last from few weeks to six months depending on the circumstances. There are different manifestations of this stage.

In the beginning individuals may feel tired or little sad. My family and I were on a new adventure and were excited to experience a new culture and life.

In another sense, it was very difficult for me because I did not know the language, I did not know how to shop, I did not know how to take my children to the doctor, and I did not know anything.

(PDF) Essay on Culture soundofheaven.info | Snezana Djuric - soundofheaven.info

I had days that were very difficult! The first night we arrived in Serbia, it was January 9. There was snow on the ground and it was VERY cold which was very different from the climate we were coming from. My 4 year old daughter was very upset and NOT one of our 15 suitcases arrived with us on the plane.

That night, as we lay in bed, I could not sleep However, usually, people are fascinated by the new and they are very excited to learn about the culture and people and become a part of the community. I was surprised by how European it seemed. Moreover, they might be enjoying increased material comfort, may feel proud that they can make themselves understood, and understand the natives, in their own language. Even learning some basic courtesies — please, thank you — helped me feel less out of place.

If people stay in the host country for a period of time longer than a month or so, they enter the second stage of culture shock known as the conflict stage. It is characterized by a hostile and aggressive attitude towards the host country. People in the conflict phase may feel tired, sick, depressed, even frustrated and angry. In Serbia, people are accustomed to plans changing at the last minute, and everyone sort of shrugs and moves on.

Shock pdf culture

When I first arrived, I expected every meeting to begin and end on time, I expected the university to be open when I needed it, and I expected the computers to always work. Therefore, they must be insensible and unsympathetic to you and your worries. Furthermore, the language barrier might increase the uneasiness one feels in the host country. However, one of the important characteristics of the conflict stage is its intensity. This means that not everyone feels the same intensity of emotions when going through this stage.

Some people may just feel uneasy, uncomfortable or even less understood; others, however, experience very strong emotions and even go through a period of deep depression. My research has shown that people experience the conflict stage mostly around some holidays and important dates.

The reason for this is that I know it is VERY difficult for my family to be away from us and our children during those times. This leads us to the third stage of culture shock known as the adjustment stage.

In this stage, people still experiences difficulties, but they are determined to finish what they have started. However, there is no a clear distinction between this stage and the ones proceeding and following it. Therefore, a person either falls back on some characteristics of the conflict stage, thus staying it that stage slightly longer or goes on to the next stage.

This is why the adjustment stage is often seen as a transitional stage of the culture shock.