soundofheaven.info Fitness BOX LIKE THE PROS PDF

Box like the pros pdf

Wednesday, April 10, 2019 admin Comments(0)

BOX lIK~ TH~ PROS BOX LIK~ TH~ PHOS Joe Frazier with William Dettloff( Sometimes they remember fights I don't remember, and then I'm like, hey, yeah. Box Like the Pros [Joe Frazier, William Dettloff] on soundofheaven.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Former World Heavyweight champion Smokin' Joe . download box like pros webxmedia pdf - soundofheaven.infoostello - box like pros webxmedia. mio primo album da colorare, ncatt aet study guide file type pdf, .


Author: HAYDEE FRAISER
Language: English, Spanish, Indonesian
Country: Kyrgyzstan
Genre: Academic & Education
Pages: 264
Published (Last): 03.10.2015
ISBN: 535-1-38960-389-8
ePub File Size: 27.36 MB
PDF File Size: 12.82 MB
Distribution: Free* [*Regsitration Required]
Downloads: 22637
Uploaded by: DESIRE

Box Like the Pros - Ebook download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read book online. Drawing from the experiences of one of the masters of the sport, Box Like the Pros is a must–have for anyone pursuing boxing as a hobby or who is interested in. Description. Download Box Like the Pros Free in pdf format. Sponsored Ads. Shop Now. Ads by Amazon · Book of Life. $$ Bestseller. ().

His defense against Luis Angel Firpo two years later drew Robinson reeled off 40 straight wins before losing to LaMotta in February in the first of their six battles. You don't see it as much on Tv, unless you have cable. But you have to know what you should eat and what you shouldn't. Fitzsimmons was boxing's first triple-division champion. Same with a foul. With your head up and your eyes looking forward, bend your arms until your chest touches the floor.

He won the welterweight title from Benitez in ' There was Aaron Pryor. He became the youngest. Hagler was a tough. There was eventual multi division champion Juho Cesar Chavez. Among the best was Salvador Sanchez. The heavyweight champion through the first half of the decade was Holmes. He outfought Tyson and fed him his own medicine. A couple years.

Tyson's time at the top was already running out. The mainstream press hadn't paid a fighter so much attention in years. Tyson's dominance was welcomed by the fans.

There were more champions and more divisions than ever before. Tyson cleaned that all up. Making matters worse. Don King. Then the IBF was formed and competed with them. There was "su- per" this and "mini" that. Over the course of the decade. They fought over in Tokyo in February He unified the title. It was crazy. The heavyweight class. Everyone saw with their own eyes what happened: Tyson got beat up.

But with the nineties around the corner. He was overconfident and didn't train right for challenger Buster Douglas. Tyson's loss didn't mean nothing else was going on. He was knocking out guys left and right and angling for a shot at Tyson.

Nobody believed it then, but I'll tell you this: He was heavier than when he fought the Butterfly and me, but he could still punch and he knew what he was doing in there. It didn't matter that he was better than 40 years old. I could see George could still hurt a man, and he would have hurt Tyson. You can't compare the guys today to the heavy- weights from the seventies. Big George proved me right in when he won back the title he'd lost to Muhammad 20 years earlier by knocking out Michael Moorer in the 10th round in Las Vegas.

Most people knew Douglas wasn't going to last long as champion, and he didn't. Evander Holyfield, who had been the cruiserweight champion, knocked him out in October to win the title and wanted to fight Tyson, but Tyson got sent away on a rape charge and did three years in prison. In the meantime, Holyfield became a good cham- pion, beating Holmes and Foreman and a fighter I had for a while, Bert Cooper.

Cooper had all the strength and skill he needed to be champ but made the wrong decisions, hung with the wrong people, and got into drugs. Still, he hurt Holyfield and almost had him out in their fight in November If the referee hadn't called it a knockdown when Holyfield staggered into the ropes, Bert might have knocked him out and been heavyweight champ of the world. Holyfield stayed champ until November , when Riddick Bowe, a big, skilled heavyweight from Brooklyn decisioned him to take the ti- tle.

Bowe had Eddie Futch, one of myoId trainers, in his corner, so he knew how to fight. Bowe and Holyfield eventually fought three times over the next few years with Bowe winning twice and Holyfield once. Holyfield eventually won the title again and beat Tyson twice- the second time when Tyson bit off part of Holyfield's ear and got disqualified. At his best, Tyson was a very good heavyweight.

I know that because he beat my boy Marvis on the way. Stopped him in less than a round, and Marvis could fight. So I knew Tyson was good.

Like pros pdf the box

But he couldn't keep his head straight and had the wrong people around him, and that did him in. Just when Bowe was gaining steam, another giant heavyweight started to make some noise. Lennox Lewis from England knocked out some top guys and over the next decade and into the twenty-first cen- tury more or less dominated the division.

Twice he got knocked out by guys who had no business knocking him out, but he came back and beat them both. He made a total of 14 title defenses and beat everyone in his era except Bowe, who wouldn't fight him. He also beat Holyfield and Tyson, but both were past their best days when he got them. There was plenty going on in the lower weight classes in the nineties, too.

The fight of the decade happened in March when Julio Cesar Chavez knocked out Meldrick Taylor, from right here in Philadelphia, in the last round. They stopped it when they shouldn't have and Taylor would have won the decision-he was ahead in the scoring-along with the undisputed junior welterweight title.

But you couldn't complain; it was a great fight between two great fighters. Tay- lor was never the same, but Chavez kept fighting a long time afterward and will go down in history as the greatest Mexican fighter ever, which is saying a lot. The guy who eventually removed Chavez from world-class com- petition was Oscar De La Hoya, the most popular fighter in the world in the late nineties and into this century.

He was a gold-medal winner and started out pro as a junior lightweight but won titles in the lightweight, junior welterweight, welterweight, and junior mid- dleweight divisions. He was flashy and good-looking like Ray Leonard, and the people loved to watch him fight. But he had his problems, too. All fighters do. In September , De La Hoya lost to Felix Trinidad, the great power-punching welterweight and middleweight champion from Puerto Rico, a fighter who would have been a champion in any era.

Later he lost twice to Shane Mosley, a quick, powerful Californian who. And when De La Hoya tried to go all the way up to middleweight, Bernard Hopkins, another Philadelphia boy, showed him how it's done in Philly and stopped him with a body shot in their fight in September As ofright now Hop- kins has defended the middleweight title more times than anyone in history. There were and are a lot of great fighters in the nineties and today-guys who could have competed in any era. There was light- weight, welterweight, and junior middleweight champion Pernell Whitaker, probably the best defensive fighter of his era.

George Ben- ton, one of myoId trainers, trained him right, so you know he was good. There was James Toney, a guy who fought like they did in the old days.

He stood still, right in front of you, and you couldn't hit him. He won pieces of the middleweight, super middleweight, and cruiser- weight titles. There was Roy Jones, one of the fastest fighters I've ever seen. He won titles, too, at middleweight, super middleweight, light heavyweight, and heavyweight. These are real good fighters, guys who would have been great in any era. They're winning titles all over the place.

But, see, that's part of the problem. It's too easy to win world titles now. There are too many sanctioning bodies and too many weight classes. It seems like almost anyone can get a title now. So they don't mean as much. Maybe it's better than it was in the old days, when there was one champion in a division. Back then guys could wait years and years to get a shot because there was only one champ.

Look at Archie Moore. And this way-the way it is now-lots of fighters can be champs and make decent money. They can make a living. I don't know. I think too many champions and too many sanctioning bodies have hurt the sport. Nobody knows who the champions are anymore. It hurts the game. And there's so much competition now for the public's attention.

It's not like in the old days. Now there's basketball and football and base- ball and tennis and hockey and golf all competing with one another.

And boxing has fallen behind. You don't read about it as much in the. You don't see it as much on Tv, unless you have cable. Some people say it's dying again. I don't believe it. They said boxing was dying when bareknuckling was outlawed, and when Dempsey retired, and when Marciano retired, and when the But- terfly retired.

But boxing isn't dying. It's always going to be here. It'll have its ups and down, like we all do. But it'll survive. It always has and it always will. You watch. In another few years there will be some new kid who comes along, maybe out of my gym in Philly, and before you know it boxing will be the biggest thing out there again.

It'll happen again. It always does. Some rules are slightly different in the professional ranks. So let's talk about the amateur ranks first. Many are the same at both the amateur and professional level. Those regulations can be broken into five categories: The Rules of the Ring l ike in any other sport. For your purposes you need to know the amateur rules first-even if you are going to box like the pros.

If you do T them in the ring. Do them and you can get disqualified. So pay attention. You can get away with a lot more in the profeSSionals. If you get three warnings. But in boxing.

Masa aktif akun hosting gratis hampir habis.

These are the weight classes for amateur men: Light Flyweight: Same with basketball. In football. Note that the weight limits differ slightly for men and women. So as you can see. They can range anywhere from three one-minute rounds in the junior Olympic and masters classes. Your age and experience also determine the number and length of the rounds you fight in the amateurs. Protect Yourself at All Times 29 Heavyweight: These are required items if you compete in any amateur bout: These are important.

This is called a "mandatory eight count. It's still always good to get your opponent out of there if you can. If you knock your opponent down. Each judge has two counting de- vices with him at ringside.

Protect Yourself at All Times 31 down. It's not a foul to hit an opponent who's not protecting himself when he should be.

That's important to remember: Here's how it works: S five judges score amateur fights. That's what does it in the amateurs. If not. But the point is to land punches-not necessarily very hard ones. Every time a judge sees the "red" fighter land a blow. At the end of the fight they count up all the totals and the fighter with more landed punches wins. If you look to the referee to complain or to your corner or at someone in the crowd and you get hit.

What is a foul in the amateurs might not be the in the pros. The referees have a lot more dis- cretion at the professional level. Some are very strict. Here's how the Association of Boxing Commissions handles it. Penalties are assigned and the outcomes affected by whether. Getting penalized for fouling is different at the professional level. Smart veteran fight- ers know how to get away with all kinds of tricks that technically are il- legal.

A few states still govern professional bouts and apply their own rules which are very similar anyway. There was a time when most states operated under their own rules. FOULS These are pretty much the same as in the amateur game except you can get away with more in the pros.

In the case of fouls deemed intentional by the referee: Protect Yourself at All Times 33 you'll see when we get into the section on judging why that's important. Mini Flyweight: Or if it's scheduled for four rounds and three rounds have not been completed. Note that the T size of the gloves that are used depends on the weight class: If four rounds have been completed. And all championship fights are scheduled for 12 rounds. For female fighters. Pro fights can be scheduled for 4.

No headgear may be worn. Women wear a shirt and. For male fighters. The more experience. That means the winner of the round gets I 0 points. Pro fights are scored round by round on the "IO-point must" sys- tem. It doesn't matter how hard they are. They can turn a fight around. If he or she cannot continue after five minutes. In the am- ateurs. In the pros. He cannot be assisted. So how do the judges determine who won a round? It's based on four criteria: And so on. By the way. It means nothing.

Chasing an oppo- nent around the ring and landing nothing would be ineffective ag- gression and should not be rewarded. If the referee rules a knockdown has occurred. Also when you would have gone down if not for the ropes. And the referee has the final say as to what is a knockdown or a foul. Here's an example of how it breaks down. Same with a foul. You just do your job and everything will take care of itself. It's not a perfect process.

Most of the time it worked out right for me. Not everyone sees fights the same way or scores them the same way. Some judges prefer boxers who move around and jab. Now you do. I wanted to win by knockout or by beating my opponent so thoroughly that there couldn't be any question about who won. Take care of your business.

Either way. I tried to take it out of the judges' hands whenever I could. Mostly this applies to learned. Others prefer guys who come forward and punch harder. Protect Yourself at All Times 37 o Ring generalship. And just like in any sport. You can't cry about it or complain to the referee. Do your job and don't worry about what your opponent is do- ing. You should know that scoring fights is a very subjective process. Do what you're trained to do and it'll work out for you.

An oppo- nent who deliberately fouls you is trying to get an advantage because he needs to. Stick to them. That's why when I was fighting. Sometimes your opponent will foul you and the referee.

And if your opponent doesn't. But eventually you'll get in the best shape of your life. To do it successfully. A lot of the time it's because they go from doing nothing to trying to take on one of the most demanding training regimens there is. And you'll be sore. You'll use muscles during a boxing workout that you didn't know you had. Even if you never plan to box competitively. They can't handle it.

Some people find the physical demands of the initial training so difficult that they give up. It increases stamina and leg strength and burns off excess fat. Not fighting shape. It's the single most important conditioning exercise a fighter does. There are no two ways about it. That way you'll be in decent shape when you walk through the doors. It's a requirement for anyone who wants to be a fighter. Without it you won't be able to go more than a couple of rounds in the ring.

It takes time. But there's a way to cut down on that: Here's what you can do to improve your conditioning in each area. I also call it "getting your gas. There are three areas you can work on before you even go to a gym that will prepare you for the boxer's workout: There's no worse feeling in the world than being in that ring with a man who's trying to take your head off and you can't move out of the way because your legs are too tired.

That happens because there's no quick and easy way to go from doing nothing to being a finely tuned athlete. There's never been a successful fighter in the modern history of prizefighting that didn't do roadwork. Practice a regimen that includes all three for a good three or four months before you go to a gym. You have to do road work.

Here's why: And don't worry about running fast. That's the way to do roadwork. Build yourself up slowly. That's it.

It's more like a short marathon. Unless you're wearing construction boots. Go out for 15 minutes. Do that for 15 minutes. Number two. Then again. Do your roadwork five or six days a week. Don't go out ex- pecting to run five or 10 miles. That's your starting point-just 15 minutes. Bump the total time up to 20 or 25 minutes. Jog again for a while. The point is to keep moving the whole time. You're in it for the long haul. Don't worry about running fast.

The day after that. People who run or jog for fun or in races wear sneakers specially made for running. If you've got a fight coming up and you're doing your roadwork and you step in a hole or some- thing and twist your ankle.

Then you don't have to worry about twisting your ankle. What you wear on your feet when you do your roadwork is up to you. A fight isn't a sprint. After a few weeks of that you'll find you can do the whole 15 minutes without stopping. If when you're done you've taken 30 or 35 minutes for three or three and a half miles about a lO-minute mile. The next day. Jog for a while. You get your legs used to running in construction boots.

I tell my fighters to wear what I wore and what the fighters in the old days wore: That means you're ready to run farther. Jog for the first You want to get your heart rate up and keep it up the whole time you're running. Over a few months. Great fighters don't need to be great runners. It gets you out there away from everybody and everything. Here are a number of stretching exercises you should do each day. They need to be loose and relaxed. You can relax and just run.

Just by doing your three miles a day you've increased your cardiovascular fitness tremendously and taken the first steps toward getting into the best shape of your life. If you get hooked on it. That's a lot to do. When I was champion of the world I could get up in them hills and run all day.

Roadwork isn't only good for your body. Doing these stretching exercises each day will help prevent muscle injury and make you more flexible and fluid-not only in the ring. The more flexible you are.

It's easy to. You should do them before you run. And once you're in shape. And even though it will hurt to do them in the begin- ning. In just three or four seconds. Do each side three times. Breathe deeply. Touch the toes on your right foot with your left hand.

You'll feel the muscles stretch in your groin area and in your back. Do this exercise three times for a count of 10 each time. Start to Get in Shape Before You Go to the Gym 43 down and then slide them forward along the floor in front of you as far as you can stretch them. With your right hand. Let your upper body bend as you pull down.

Hold the posi- tion for a count of 10 and do it three times on each side. When you've gotten as far as you can go. Remember to breathe. This stretches your hamstring. Repeat on the opposite leg and do it three times for a count of 10 on each side. This stretches your shoulder and the muscles in your side.

Keep your leg straight while slowly pulling the ends of the towel up and in. Pull it toward you until you feel the muscle stretch hard. This is something my son Marvis and I disagree on. And it's a good bet you'll need to be stronger than you are right now.

He feels that a stronger athlete is a better athlete. He's a. A lot of fighters today use weight training to get bigger and stronger. Do this three times with each leg. This stretches the thigh muscle. Do each leg for a count of 10 three times. This will stretch the calf muscle in the set-back leg. Doing calisthenics. Lean in against the wall. Hold that position for a count of You'll need strength and some muscle to withstand punishment.

And if lifting weights makes you stronger and gives you that edge. Bend the front leg. Hold for a count of 10 and then repeat with the left hand and foot. But other than that. You already can fight. If you can't fight. I don't tell my fighters to hft weights.

You get the same benefit from doing them in sets with short breaks between. And you don't need to do hundreds of them to get the benefit. I'm more from the old school. You've got to be able to fight. Neither did Jack Dempsey or Jack Johnson. And if you can fight-if you're in shape and committed and do what your trainer tells you-you don't need big muscles. Gans was the first native-born black American to win a world title. His second-round kayo loss to McGovern in December was derided as an obvious fix and the only one historians think Gans was involved in.

Many fights from the era were fixed, and most of the era's prominent fighters probably were involved in at least a couple here or there. Gans was no exception. The frequency of fixed fights, which existed mainly because of betting, led legislators early in the twentieth century to permit only nodecision bouts.

That is, any fight that didn't end in knockout and went the full distance was judged a "no-decision. The newspaper press covering the fight from ringside determined unofficial winners. And, of course, they could be bought just like anyone else. This led to all sorts of confusion and to lesser-quality fights.

CA fighter knew he could get by without a loss against a better fighter so long as he lasted the distance. Until then, it helped if you could punch very hard. Middleweight champion Stanley Ketchel was probably the era's hardest hitter, pound for pound. In an era when relatively few fights ended in knockouts, his record shows long streaks during which none of his opponents lasted the distance.

He scored 49 knockouts in 52 career wins, a very high knockout ratio for the era, and was one of the most-feared fighters in the world.

People thought so much of Ketchel that he got a shot at heavyweight champ Jack Johnson in October What nobody knew at the time was that Ketchel and J ohnson had agreed that they would go easy so that the fight would go the distance-in order to generate more money from the motion-picture sales.

After 11 relaxed rounds, he charged out in the 12th and caught Johnson with a big right, sending him down. Furious at being doublecrossed, Johnson got up and knocked him cold with a right, shearing off five of his teeth in the process. The next year Ketchel was shot and killed by a farmhand who was infatuated with a woman Ketchel was dating. Ketchel was 24 years old. The fight game was still growing at the turn of the century and finding itself over the next decade.

There were lots of problems. But things were about to get better. There was boxing, baseball, and horse racing. And boxing was king.

Jack Dempsey no relation to "the Nonpareil" was the era's greatest sports hero, right up there with Babe Ruth. As a young man he rode the rails all over the country in boxcars and lived in hobo camps looking for work.

He found it in the ring, and after tearing through much of the heavyweight division, slaughtered the giant Jess Willard in three rounds in July to win the title. Dempsey's drawing power was unmatched as the heavyweight champion. He retired after his second loss to Tunney-the famous "Long Count" battle- as one of the most popular figures in the history of sport. Dempsey wasn't the only boxing legend to do his best work in the s.

He wasn't even the best fighter. Maybe Harry Greb was. Greb held the middleweight title from to '26, and by the time he retired he had torn through the best middleweights and light heavyweights of the era.

He was the only man to whip Dempsey's tormentor, Tunney. He was stopped just twice in fights , and fought the last five years of his career blind in one eye. Many historians rate Greb the greatest middleweight ever. If you don't like Greb, try little Jimmy Wilde, probably the best fly- weight in history.

Wilde was a skinny, frail-looking fighter who ruled the flyweights from to ' He won his first 98 fights in a row against the best men of his size in the world and won the title with a 12th-round knockout of Joe Symonds. By the time he retired, he had lost just three times in fights and scored 99 knockouts. If pounders don't interest you, there was Benny Leonard at , arguably the best lightweight ever.

Leonard thrilled huge crowds all over the country with his cerebral skills and deadly fists , and held the world title from to ' Then there was the wonderful Tony Canzoneri, who won world titles in the featherweight, lightweight, and junior welterweight divisions between and Or Canzoneri's great rival, Barney Ross, who also was a three-division champion.

Ross's battles with Canzoneri and Jimmy McLarnin, another great of the era, drew thousands, as did the adventures of Mickey Walker, "the Toy Bulldog," who was a hugely popular welterweight and middleweight champion in the s and a stablemate of Dempsey's.

The late s saw the emergence of Joe Louis, my boyhood hero, whose title reign would stretch into the following decade. But of all these heroes, it's possible Henry Armstrong was the best. He was the first and only fighter in history to simultaneously hold world titles in three weight classes. That's a span of 35 pounds between all those classes. He still holds the record for most title defenses at welterweight and is considered by many the secondgreatest fighter ever pound for pound, behind Sugar Ray Robinson.

He fought the same way I did: Plenty of wonderful fighters claimed their places among the greats in the decades that followed. And millions of fans all over the world would fall in love with the fight game in the years and decades that followed. But there will never be another year span like the one from to It was a rich, beautiful era in boxing. The world wasn't a perfect place then, but it was heaven if you were a fight fan.

Usually when they do they forget that every period has its downside. For example, in former middleweight champion Jake LaMotta told a special Senate subcommittee investigating corruption in boxing that he'd thrown a fight against Billy Fox in LaMotta told the committee he'd taken the dive because he had to "play ball" to get a ti- A tle shot.

Blinky Palermo, a known gangster, managed Fox. And he did. Today we know that organized crime had infiltrated pro boxing to a large degree at least from the late s to the late s-the very time period that many recall today as "the good old days. He was the most powerful man in the business. And his friends were guys like Palermo and Frankie Carbo, who were known gangsters. In the mids, the federal government began an investigation, and in '58 they dissolved the IBC and the empire Norris had built.

But the damage was already done. You didn't have to tell the great lightweight champ Ike Williams how things were. Williams held the title from '47 to '51, and he told the same Senate committee how Palermo, the Managers Guild, and the IBC had tried to blackball him and ruin his career. Like a lot of fighters, he hardly had a dime to his name when his career ended, and he'd fought almost fights. There were times, he said, when he never saw a penny from his purse.

Many fighters revealed, after their careers were over, that gangsters had approached them with offers to throw fights but that they refused them.

But some of them did falter-LaMotta, for one. Featherweight great Willie Pep probably did, too: Surely there were many unrecorded others.

For all the problems the mob wrought, the s and s were wonderful years for boxing. Heavyweight champion Joe Louis was a national hero. He won the title from James J Braddock in June , and by the time the new decade started, his title reign was in full swing. An accurate, calm, and deadly two-fisted puncher, Louis filled the biggest stadiums whenever he fOUght.

His June rematch with the German Max Schmeling, who had knocked out Louis two years earlier, was perhaps the most politically significant prizefight ever.

The 70, fans in attendance erupted when Louis avenged his only defeat with a first-round KO. But Louis always packed them in. By the time Louis enlisted in the U. Army at the start of World War Il, he'd already made 21 title defenses. When the war ended and he was discharged in '46, he continued his reign, but he wasn't the same fighter anymore. He made four more title defenses, retired, then came back to be knocked out by Rocky Marciano in the eighth round in October , which finished him for good.

He still holds the record for most title defenses and longest reign ever in any weight class. In my eyes he's the best heavyweight champion there ever was. Louis may have been a near-perfect fighter, but he wasn't perfect. Though it may be that another fighter from his era was. In , Sugar Ray Robinson turned pro. Robinson reeled off 40 straight wins before losing to LaMotta in February in the first of their six battles. He then went 91 fights before losing again, along the way winning and defending the welterweight title.

In '50 he added the middleweight title, and in the ensuing years lost and regained the title several times, and came close to claiming the light heavyweight crown, too. Robinson's combination of speed, punching power, skill, and ring smarts led the sportswriters of the day to call him the best fighter in the world pound for pound, and today he's remembered as the best overall fighter who ever lived.

Robinson was so good he lost just 19 times in fights. And 15 of those 19 losses came when he was 37 years of age or older, which is old for a prizefighter. In his prime, Robinson was untouchable. Willie Pep also turned pro in '40, and went three years and 63 fights before losing. After dropping a decision to Sammy Angott in March , he ran off another streak, this one lasting five years and 73 fights. That streak ended in '49, when Sandy Saddler stopped him and claimed the title.

Pep reclaimed the crown in a rematch, then lost two more to Saddler. He fought on for another 15 The Fight Game 11 years, winning much more than losing. Pep was a light puncher but a brilliant defensive fighter. Most historians rank him as the best defensive fighter in history, but he was more than that. Like Robinson, he didn't lose much until he got older. In fights he lost just 11 times; three were to Saddler and seven came after Pep turned 30 years old.

He's easily one of the five or six best fighters ever to have put on gloves. There were other great heroes in the s: There was Ezzard Charles, too, who followed Louis as heavyweight champion and never got the credit he deserved, and several wonderful prizefighters who never won world titles: The good old days weren't perfect.

But they were good. They were very good. The upside was that it brought the fights directly to the fans. But that meant they didn't have to go to the fights live anymore to see them. The effect on live gates was significant, though that didn't stop business. In the fifties you could watch live boxing free on television five nights a week, and there was no shortage of stars.

Maybe the biggest star of the fifties was Rocky Marciano. Overflowing with physical strength, confidence, determination, and punching power, Marciano powered his way up the heavyweight rankings in '50 and '51, earning a title shot by knocking out and retiring the great Joe Louis. Then, in , he did something no heavyweight champion had done before or since: And he stayed retired. That record puts him up there with the greatest heavyweight champions. Marciano's last fight was against Archie Moore, another all-time great.

Moore had turned pro way back in but wasn't able to get a shot at the light heavyweight title until he was 36 years old and into his 18th year as a pro. He had been the top-rated contender for 10 years but was ducked by one champion after another.

He finally got his shot against champion Joey Maxim in December , and he didn't waste it. He beat Maxim and held the title for nine years, the longest reign ever in the light heavyweight division. His career knockouts are also a record. Though always a light heavyweight, he fought heavyweights like Marciano throughout his career but was never able to win the title. The s showcased dozens oflegendary fighters: Kid Gavilan, the cagey old welterweight champion who held the title for three years and wasn't stopped once in fights.

There was welterweight and middleweight champion Carmen Basilio, who fought sizzling wars with Tony DeMarco and Gene Fullmer and a savage series with the great Sugar Ray Robinson, who fought well into the decade and beyond. Ezzard Charles, too, was a factor at heavyweight into the fifties. In November , FIoyd Patterson knocked out Archie Moore to claim the heavyweight title Marciano had given up, but in the decade's final year he was stopped and dethroned by Swedish puncher Ingemar Johansson.

For all the stars the decade held, the days of the monster-stadium crowds largely were coming to an end. Only Marciano could draw well more than 20, on a regular basis.

Television was exposing the fight game to a larger crowd than ever before, but the crowd wasn't at ringside-they were in living rooms across America. However, as the s began, boxing's popularity hit an all-time low as a result of three factors that came together in quick succession: It was the first time a fighter had been killed on national television, and the sport all but vanished from TV for the next several years.

It wasn't the best time to be a fight fan. And that was too bad, because there were good fighters and good fights everywhere you looked. Maybe the best overall fighter of the s was Carlos Ortiz, who held the lightweight and junior welterweight titles and made 11 defenses over several reigns. If it wasn't Ortiz, maybe it was Brazil's Eder Jofre, the world bantamweight champion. Griffith, too, was a multidivision champion, winning titles at welterweight and middleweight and engaging in a series of fights with Paret and Luis Rodriguez.

Light heavyweight Bob Foster destroyed Dick Tiger in May to start a long reign as the pound champion, and in June Willie Pastrano beat Harold Johnson in one of the decade's biggest upsets. The brilliant Jose Napoles won the welterweight title in '69, the same year the power-punching Mexican sensation Ruben Olivares claimed the bantamweight crown. In June , Patterson became the first heavyweight in history to regain the title when he stopped Johannson in front of 45, fans in New York, but in September , Sonny Liston destroyed him to take the title.

The star of the decade was Cassius Clay, who a lot of the time I call the Butterfly. He came out of the Olympics with a gold medal and a lot of talk and people watched him. Some of them wanted him to lose, others wanted him to win, but either way, he could fight. He was big and fast and could move on his feet. He beat some good contenders on the way up and in February shocked the world, like he said he would, when he beat Liston to win the heavyweight title.

Afterward he changed his name to Muhammad Ali and became a Muslim. That's when his troubles started. He defended the title nine times. So the V. He didn't get it back for three years. While the Butterfly had been defending the title, I was making a name for myself as a young pro. I'd won a gold medal at the '64 Olympics and turned pro in '65, the year after Muhammad won the title. I fought good contenders on the way up, too, and was undefeated when, in '68, I fought Buster Mathis for the New York world title made vacant when they stripped the Butterfly.

The respected New York State Athletic Commission disagreed with the World Boxing Association's method for selecting a successor to Ali and sanctioned my bout with Mathis as being for their version of the world title.

I stopped Mathis, and two years later, in February , gained worldwide recognition as the heavyweight champion when I knocked out Jimmy Ellis in four rounds. The seventies were right around the corner, and they'd be bigger than anyone knew. He had a couple of tune-up fights and it was only natural that we should meet and decide once and for all who the real heavyweight champ was. I knew it was me, but since he'd never lost the title in the ring he thought he was still the champ.

So we got together to settle it. Our fight on March 8, , in Madison Square Garden was the biggest fight since Louis knocked out Schmeling in their rematch 33 years earlier.

They dubbed it "The Fight of the Century," and that's what it was. Madison Square Garden sold out. An estimated million people watched on close-circuit or satellite television, and in the 15th round I clipped the Butterfly'S The Fight Game 15 wings with a hook and dropped him, and won a unanimous decision.

It was one of the biggest fights ever. In the biggest fight in 30 years, I clipped the Butterfly's wings. The Butterfly and I fought twice more in the seventies. I got jobbed out of the decision in the rematch in New York in January , and my corner stopped our war in September 'the "Thrilla in ManiIa"-after the 14th round.

They were all great fights. The late sixties and seventies were great times for heavyweights. Most historians think it was the deepest heavyweight division in history, and I agree. There were so many good fighters: He was the strongest, hardest-hitting guy I ever fought, and one of the best ever.

And, late in the decade, there was Larry Holmes, who ended up holding the title for seven years. He rode a 56fight, six-year undefeated streak into the decade and after 14 successful title defenses retired as the middleweight champion in ' If you didn't like him, maybe you liked the great lightweight champion Roberto Duran, who unified the title, made 12 defenses over a six-year reign, and knocked out all but one of his challengers.

There were other greats in the lower weight classes; featherweight power-puncher Alexis Arguello stopped Olivares to start a long reign of his own.

Welterweight phenomenon Wilfred Benitez became the youngest fighter ever to win a professional world title when, just 17 years old, he decisioned Antonio Cervantes.

Box Like the Pros | Mike Tyson | Boxers

Benitez was the best defensive boxer of his era, a modern-day Willie Pep. Even with all the great fighters around, it was the Butterfly who stole the show in the seventies. After our rematch he put together some wins, and then went and knocked out Big George in Africa in October "The Rumble in the Jungle" they called it- in a huge upset. Then he made a string of title defenses. Even though he was 36 years old and slOwing down, no one thought the Butterfly would lose to Leon Spinks in their fight in February , but that's what happened.

Spinks, a United States gold-medal winner from the '76 Olympics, had only seven pro fights and was an underdog.

But Muhammad took him lightly, didn't train right, and Leon whupped him. Seven months later they fought again and the Butterfly outpointed him, becoming the only heavyweight in history to win the title three times. Both the Butterfly and I retired in the s.

I called it a career after Big George stopped me again, this time in ' The Butterfly quit after the second Spinks fight, then came back in '80 and was stopped by Holmes, the next era's best heavyweight. But we'd always be connected, and so were our final fights. I decided to give it one last try and in December '81 drew with Jumbo Cummings before calling it a career for good. Eight days later the Butterfly lost to Trevor Berbick, and that was it for him, too.

Fortunately, boxing didn't need the Butterfly and me to survive. The late seventies and eighties spawned a whole new set of stars. He was fast and flashy and the fans loved him. He won the welterweight title from Benitez in '79, and, over the next several years retired and came back several times, eventually whipping Marvelous Marvin Hagler in March in the decade's biggest upset.

Hagler was a tough, hard-hitting, talented southpaw who had held the middleweight title for seven years and had made 12 title defenses. He, Leonard, Benitez, Duran, and Thomas Hearns all fought at around the same weight and all fought one another throughout the decade. They were the stars of the eighties and produced great fights, especially the Hagler-Hearns slugfest in April , one of the most exciting title fights ever. The heavyweight champion through the first half of the decade was Holmes, who stopped my boy Marvis in a title fight November I told Marvis then it was nothing to be ashamed of and I was right; before he lost the title to Michael Spinks in '85, Holmes had run up 20 successful title defenses.

Spinks, yet another gold-medal winner from that '76 V. Olympic team and Leon's brother , had been a dominant hght heavyweight champion who made 10 defenses over a fouryear reign before beating Holmes to become the first hght heavyweight champion in history to also win the heavyweight title. There were dozens of other wonderful fighters in the s. Among the best was Salvador Sanchez, the featherweight champion whose career was cut short when he was killed in a car crash in ' There was eventual multi division champion Juho Cesar Chavez, who was probably the greatest Mexican champion ever, and hght heavyweight champion Matthew Saad Muhammad from right here in Philadelphia.

There was Aaron Pryor, a modern-day Henry Armstrong in style and desire. But the fighter who dominated the sport and the heavyweight division over the second half of the decade was Mike Tyson, whose combination of speed, power, defense, and charisma made him a fan favorite and the biggest draw in the game since All.

Tyson's dominance was welcomed by the fans. Over the course of the decade, control over boxing by the WBC and the WBA, the sport's longtime sanctioning bodies, strengthened. Then the IBF was formed and competed with them. Making matters worse, each organization crowned its own champion, and then they added three new divisions: There was "super" this and "mini" that.

It was crazy. There were more champions and more divisions than ever before. The heavyweight class, the game's glamour division, was a mess, a revolving door of mediocre titleholders.

Tyson cleaned that all up. He unified the title, and for the first time in a long while everyone knew who the heavyweight champ was. The mainstream press hadn't paid a fighter so much attention in years. But with the nineties around the corner, Tyson's time at the top was already running out. He was overconfident and didn't train right for challenger Buster Douglas, a whopping underdog.

They fought over in Tokyo in February , and Douglas, never a great fighter before, was a very good fighter on this night. He outfought Tyson and fed him his own medicine, knocking him out in the 10th round. Don King, who'd started promoting guys back in my day and was the most powerful guy in the sport, tried to say Tyson was robbed or something, but nobody bought it. Everyone saw with their own eyes what happened: Tyson got beat up.

Tyson's loss didn't mean nothing else was going on. A couple years The Fight Game 19 before, my oId buddy Big George had started a comeback after 10 years out of the ring. He was knocking out guys left and right and angling for a shot at Tyson. Nobody believed it then, but I'll tell you this: He was heavier than when he fought the Butterfly and me, but he could still punch and he knew what he was doing in there. It didn't matter that he was better than 40 years old.

I could see George could still hurt a man, and he would have hurt Tyson. You can't compare the guys today to the heavyweights from the seventies. Big George proved me right in when he won back the title he'd lost to Muhammad 20 years earlier by knocking out Michael Moorer in the 10th round in Las Vegas. Most people knew Douglas wasn't going to last long as champion, and he didn't. Evander Holyfield, who had been the cruiserweight champion, knocked him out in October to win the title and wanted to fight Tyson, but Tyson got sent away on a rape charge and did three years in prison.

In the meantime, Holyfield became a good champion, beating Holmes and Foreman and a fighter I had for a while, Bert Cooper. Cooper had all the strength and skill he needed to be champ but made the wrong decisions, hung with the wrong people, and got into drugs.

Still, he hurt Holyfield and almost had him out in their fight in November If the referee hadn't called it a knockdown when Holyfield staggered into the ropes, Bert might have knocked him out and been heavyweight champ of the world.

Holyfield stayed champ until November , when Riddick Bowe, a big, skilled heavyweight from Brooklyn decisioned him to take the title. Bowe had Eddie Futch, one of myoId trainers, in his corner, so he knew how to fight.

Bowe and Holyfield eventually fought three times over the next few years with Bowe winning twice and Holyfield once. Holyfield eventually won the title again and beat Tyson twice- the second time when Tyson bit off part of Holyfield's ear and got disqualified. At his best, Tyson was a very good heavyweight. Stopped him in less than a round, and Marvis could fight. So I knew Tyson was good. But he couldn't keep his head straight and had the wrong people around him, and that did him in. Just when Bowe was gaining steam, another giant heavyweight started to make some noise.

Lennox Lewis from England knocked out some top guys and over the next decade and into the twenty-first century more or less dominated the division. Twice he got knocked out by guys who had no business knocking him out, but he came back and beat them both. He made a total of 14 title defenses and beat everyone in his era except Bowe, who wouldn't fight him. He also beat Holyfield and Tyson, but both were past their best days when he got them.

There was plenty going on in the lower weight classes in the nineties, too. The fight of the decade happened in March when Julio Cesar Chavez knocked out Meldrick Taylor, from right here in Philadelphia, in the last round.

They stopped it when they shouldn't have and Taylor would have won the decision-he was ahead in the scoring-along with the undisputed junior welterweight title. But you couldn't complain; it was a great fight between two great fighters. Taylor was never the same, but Chavez kept fighting a long time afterward and will go down in history as the greatest Mexican fighter ever, which is saying a lot.

The guy who eventually removed Chavez from world-class competition was Oscar De La Hoya, the most popular fighter in the world in the late nineties and into this century.

He was a gold-medal winner and started out pro as a junior lightweight but won titles in the lightweight, junior welterweight, welterweight, and junior middleweight divisions. He was flashy and good-looking like Ray Leonard, and the people loved to watch him fight. But he had his problems, too. All fighters do. In September , De La Hoya lost to Felix Trinidad, the great power-punching welterweight and middleweight champion from Puerto Rico, a fighter who would have been a champion in any era.

Later he lost twice to Shane Mosley, a quick, powerful Californian who The Fight Game 21 also won titles at lightweight and welterweight. And when De La Hoya tried to go all the way up to middleweight, Bernard Hopkins, another Philadelphia boy, showed him how it's done in Philly and stopped him with a body shot in their fight in September As ofright now Hopkins has defended the middleweight title more times than anyone in history.

There were and are a lot of great fighters in the nineties and today-guys who could have competed in any era.

There was lightweight, welterweight, and junior middleweight champion Pernell Whitaker, probably the best defensive fighter of his era. George Benton, one of myoId trainers, trained him right, so you know he was good. There was James Toney, a guy who fought like they did in the old days. He stood still, right in front of you, and you couldn't hit him.

Box Like the Pros

He won pieces of the middleweight, super middleweight, and cruiserweight titles. There was Roy Jones, one of the fastest fighters I've ever seen.

He won titles, too, at middleweight, super middleweight, light heavyweight, and heavyweight. These are real good fighters, guys who would have been great in any era. They're winning titles all over the place. But, see, that's part of the problem.

It's too easy to win world titles now. There are too many sanctioning bodies and too many weight classes. It seems like almost anyone can get a title now. So they don't mean as much. Maybe it's better than it was in the old days, when there was one champion in a division.

Pdf box pros like the

Back then guys could wait years and years to get a shot because there was only one champ. Look at Archie Moore. And this way-the way it is now-lots of fighters can be champs and make decent money. They can make a living. I don't know. I think too many champions and too many sanctioning bodies have hurt the sport. Nobody knows who the champions are anymore.

It hurts the game. And there's so much competition now for the public's attention. It's not like in the old days. Now there's basketball and football and baseball and tennis and hockey and golf all competing with one another. And boxing has fallen behind. You don't see it as much on Tv, unless you have cable. Some people say it's dying again. I don't believe it.

They said boxing was dying when bareknuckling was outlawed, and when Dempsey retired, and when Marciano retired, and when the Butterfly retired. But boxing isn't dying. It's always going to be here. It'll have its ups and down, like we all do. But it'll survive. It always has and it always will. You watch. In another few years there will be some new kid who comes along, maybe out of my gym in Philly, and before you know it boxing will be the biggest thing out there again.

It'll happen again. It always does. The Rules of the Ring l ike in any other sport, there are rules that govern boxing. Many are the same at both the amateur and professional level. Some rules are slightly different in the professional ranks, and some even vary within the pro game. For your purposes you need to know the amateur rules first-even if you are going to box like the pros, you need to start as an amateur. So let's talk about the amateur ranks first. Those regulations can be broken into five categories: If you do T them in the ring, you'll get a warning from the referee.

If you get three warnings, you can get disqualified. So pay attention, these are important. Again, all of these are fouls. Do them and you can get disqualified. You can get away with a lot more in the profeSSionals, but in the amateurs, you just don't do them unless you want to get out of a fight, and in that case you shouldn't be in there to begin with.

In football, if you're just not big enough, you don't make the team. Same with basketball. But in boxing, you'll only fight opponents who are about your size, because everyone's broken into weight classes. Note that the weight limits differ slightly for men and women.

These are the weight classes for amateur men: Light Flyweight: Web Hosting Premium Rp. Web Hosting Bisnis Rp. Butuh power lebih untuk proyek online Anda? Cek paket cloud hosting dengan teknologi terbaru. Lihat Paket Hosting. Jaminan 30 hari uang kembali Jika tidak puas dengan layanan Hostinger, kami akan mengembalikan uang Anda sepenuhnya.

Kemudahan Website Builder Jaminan Uptime