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Microsoft office 2007 for dummies pdf

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1, Calculus Practice Problems For Dummies®,. Published by: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., River St., Hoboken, NJ registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. All other trademarks ing Office All-in-One For Dummies, as well as 45 other computer books about various . international editions, contact your local Microsoft Corporation office or contact Microsoft Press International directly at fax ()


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Move the mouse pointer Chapter 3 Getting Help from Office In This Chapter ᮣ Opening and browsing the Help Microsoft office for. with Office , Microsoft added its most important feature ever — making . with Office on a “dummy” document filled with useless information you. Trademarks: Wiley, the Wiley Publishing logo, For Dummies, the Dummies Man logo, Word is a part of the Microsoft Office suite of programs.

List box Gallery Customizing an Office Program If you want to modify how a particular Office program works, you can customize its features. Clicking an icon immediately chooses a command to alter your data. Choose All Programs. Handles Showing Off a Presentation.

Chapter 5: Formatting Text. Chapter 6: Designing Your Pages. Part III: Playing the Numbers with Excel. Chapter 7: The Basics of Spreadsheets: Numbers, Labels, and Formulas.

Chapter 8: Playing with Formulas. Chapter 9: Charting and Analyzing Data. Part IV: Making Presentations with PowerPoint. Chapter Creating a PowerPoint Presentation. Adding Color and Pictures to a Presentation.

Showing Off a Presentation. Part V: Getting Organized with Outlook. Organizing E-Mail with Outlook. Storing Contacts and Organizing Tasks. Scheduling Your Time. Part VI: Storing Stuff in Access. Using a Database. Searching, Sorting, and Querying a Database. Creating a Database Report. Part VII: The Part of Tens. Getting to Know Microsoft Office 3. Click the template you want to use and then click the Download button. Office downloads and creates a new file based on your chosen template.

To open an existing file, you need to tell Office the location and name of the file you want to open. Just follow these steps: Click the Office Button and then choose Open.

An Open dialog box appears, as shown in Figure The Open dialog box lets you change drives and folders to find the file you want to use. Optional To choose a different drive to look for files, click Computer under the Favorite Links panel see the left side of Figure Then click the drive where you want to load the file, such as the C: Optional Click a folder and then click Open to search for a file inside a folder.

Repeat this step as many times as necessary. Click the file you want to open and then click Open. Your chosen file appears ready for editing. Getting to Know Microsoft Office When you click the Open command under Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access, an additional window appears to the right that contains a list of the last files you opened. Saving files Saving a file stores all your data on a hard disk or other storage device such as a Compact Flash card.

The first time you save a file, you need to specify three items: By default, Office stores all your files in the Documents folder.

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The format of your file defines how Office stores your data. The default file format is known as Office format, which simply means that only people with Office can reliably open and view the contents of that file. A drop-down menu appears. Click Save. Getting to Know Microsoft Office Figure The Save As dialog box lets you choose the name, file format, and a location to save your file.

Optional To specify a drive and folder to save your file, click Browse Folders. This causes the dialog box to expand, as shown in the bottom dialog box in Figure Now you can click Computer, under Favorite Links, and then click a folder. Or, click the New Folder button; when the New Folder dialog box appears, type a name for your new folder and then click OK. Click in the File Name text box and type a descriptive name for your file.

Getting to Know Microsoft Office Saving a file for older versions of Microsoft Office If you need to share files with people using older versions of Microsoft Office, you need to save your files in a different file format known as , such as Word Document or PowerPoint Presentation.

When you save files in the format, Microsoft Office saves your files with a three-letter file extension, like. When you save files in the Office format, Microsoft Office saves your files with a four or five-letter file extension, such as. Click the Office Button and then choose Save As. A Save As dialog box appears. Click in the Save as Type list box.

Office 2007 For Dummies

A list of different formats appears, as shown in Figure Choose the format option, such as Word Format or Excel Format. Most programs can accept files stored in the format, but many older programs cannot, so you may have to resort to saving a file in one of these other formats instead.

The Save as Type list box lets you choose a file format for saving your file. Optional Click in the File Name text box and type a descriptive name for your file.

Closing a file simply removes the file from your screen but keeps your Office program running so you can edit or open another file. To close a file, follow these steps: Click the Office Button and then choose Close. Click Yes to save your changes, No to discard any changes, or Cancel to keep your file open.

If you click either Yes or No, Office closes your file. Using the Quick Access toolbar The Quick Access toolbar appears to the right of the Office Button refer to Figure near the top of the screen, displaying icons that represent commonly used commands such as Save, Undo, and Redo as shown in Figure If you click the Print icon in the Quick Access toolbar, Office immediately prints one copy of your entire file through the default printer.

If you want to specify a different printer to use, the number of copies to print, or specific pages to print, click the Office Button and choose Print instead.

The Redo icon reverses the last Undo command you chose. For example, if you delete a paragraph, Office makes that paragraph disappear.

Then if you immediately click the Undo icon, the paragraph magically reappears. If you immediately click the Redo icon, the Redo command reverses the Undo command and deletes the paragraph once more.

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The Undo icon is unique in that it offers two ways to use it. First, you can click the Undo icon to undo the last action you chose. Second, you can click the downward-pointing arrow that appears to the right of the Undo icon to display a list of one or more of your previous actions, as shown in Figure The Undo icon displays a list of actions you can undo. Getting to Know Microsoft Office The most recent action you chose appears at the top of this list, the second most recent action appears second, and so on.

To undo multiple commands, follow these steps: Click the downward-pointing arrow that appears to the right of the Undo icon in the Quick Access toolbar. Move the mouse pointer to highlight one or more actions you want to undo. Click the left mouse button. Office undoes all the multiple actions you selected.

Adding icons The Quick Access toolbar is designed to put your most commonly used commands where you can always find them. To add other icons to the Quick Access toolbar, follow these steps: A pull-down menu appears. You can add an icon to the toolbar by just clicking on an icon name, such as Quick Print or New, from the pull-down menu.

Click More Commands. An Options window appears, as shown in Figure The panel on the right shows all the current icons on the Quick Access toolbar. The panel on the left shows all the additional icons you can add. The Options window lets you select the icons you want to add to the Quick Access toolbar. The left panel displays a list of icons and commands. Click an icon and then click the Add button. Optional Repeat Steps 3 and 4 for each additional icon you want to add to the Quick Access toolbar.

Click OK. Your chosen icon or icons now appears on the Quick Access toolbar. Removing icons You can remove icons from the Quick Access toolbar at any time. To remove an icon, follow these steps: Right-click an icon on the Quick Access toolbar. Click Remove from Quick Access Toolbar. Office removes your selected icon from the Quick Access toolbar. Click the Customize Quick Access Toolbar arrow. Minimizing the Ribbon You can tuck the Ribbon out of sight temporarily so it only appears when you click on a tab such as Home or Insert.

To hide the Ribbon, follow these steps: Getting to Know Microsoft Office 1. Click Minimize the Ribbon. Office hides the Ribbon and only displays the tabs. To display the Ribbon again, repeat these two steps. Using the Ribbon The Ribbon organizes commands into categories called contextual tabs. Each tab displays a different group of commands. For example, the Page Layout tab displays only those commands related to designing a page, and the Insert tab displays only those commands related to inserting items into a file, such as a page break or a picture, as shown in Figure Each tab displays a different group of related commands.

Using the Ribbon is a two-step process. First, you must click the tab that contains the command you want. Second, you click the actual command. Tabs act exactly like traditional pull-down menus. Whereas a pull-down menu simply displays a list of commands, tabs display a list of icons that represent different commands.

Deciphering Ribbon icons The main idea behind organizing commands within tabs is to avoid overwhelming you with a barrage of different commands. Although most icons include a short text description, you can get additional help deciphering different icons through ScreenTips, which typically displays the following, as shown in Figure ScreenTips explain what each command does.

To view the ScreenTip for a command, move the mouse pointer over a command and wait a few seconds for the ScreenTip appear. Shortcut keystrokes let you choose a command from the keyboard without the hassle of clicking a tab and then clicking the command buried inside that tab. Using Live Preview In the past, you might have known what a particular command did, but you would never know how it would affect your file until after you chose that command.

Oftentimes, you might choose a command, see how it changed your file, and then undo the change because it may not be what you really wanted. To avoid this hassle of constant experimentation with different commands, Office offers a feature called Live Preview. Live Preview lets you move the mouse pointer over certain icons displayed in a tab and then immediately see the changes displayed in your current file.

To use Live Preview, follow these steps: Move the cursor or click the mouse on an object text, picture, table, and so on that you want to change. Move the mouse pointer over any command. Office shows you how your chosen object will look if you choose the command, as shown in Figure Live Preview lets you see how a particular command could change your file. In Word, Live Preview will not work if you display your document in Draft view.

Giving commands to Office To give a command to Office , you need to follow these basic steps: Select an item text, picture, table, and so on that you want to modify. Click a tab that contains the command you want. Click the command you want to use. Command icons work in one of three ways, as shown in Figure Clicking an icon immediately chooses a command to alter your data. The Bold and Italic icons are examples of icons that you click only once to choose them.

Some icons display a downward-pointing arrow to the right. Clicking these icons displays a list of additional options. The Font and Font Size icons are examples of list box icons.

Some icons display a downward-pointing arrow that displays a drop-down list of additional commands, called a gallery. Commands appear as icons, list boxes, or galleries. List box Gallery Customizing an Office Program If you want to modify how a particular Office program works, you can customize its features. To customize an Office program, follow these steps: Load the Office program you want to customize.

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An Options dialog box appears, as shown in Figure The Options dialog box lets you change how an Office program behaves. Click a category, such as Save or Display. The Options dialog box displays multiple options for you to customize. If you click the Save category in Step 4, you can define a default file format and file location for storing files for each Office program Word, Excel, and so on. Exiting Office No matter how much you may love using Office , eventually there will come a time when you need to exit an Office program and do something else with your life.

To exit from any Office program except Outlook , choose one of the following: Getting to Know Microsoft Office If you try to close an Office program before saving your file, a dialog box pops up to give you a chance to save your file. Editing can add, rearrange, or delete data, such as text, numbers, or pictures. Adding Data by Pointing When you enter data into a file, your data appears wherever the cursor appears on the screen.

To move the cursor using the mouse, follow these steps: Move the mouse pointer where you want to move the cursor. The cursor appears where you click the mouse pointer. Getting to Know Microsoft Office To move the cursor using the keyboard, you can use one of many cursor movement keys: To move the cursor faster, hold down the Ctrl key and then press the arrow keys.

If you hold down the Ctrl key, the up-arrow key moves the cursor up one paragraph, the down-arrow key moves the cursor down one paragraph, the left-arrow key moves the cursor left one word, and the right-arrow key moves the cursor right one word.

Pressing the Home key moves the cursor to the beginning of a sentence or a row in a spreadsheet , and pressing the End key moves the cursor to the end of a sentence or a row in a spreadsheet. Using any of the cursor movement keys moves the cursor to a new location. Wherever the cursor appears will be where you can enter new data.

Table lists ways to move the cursor in each Office program. Chapter 2: Then choose a command that changes your data, such as underlining text or deleting a picture. To select anything in Office , you can use either the mouse or the keyboard. Generally, the mouse is faster but takes some time getting used to coordinating the motion of the mouse with the movement of the mouse pointer on the screen. The keyboard is slower but much simpler to use. Selecting data with the mouse The mouse provides two ways to select data.

The first way involves pointing and dragging the mouse, as shown in Figure Point the mouse pointer at the beginning or end of the data you want to select. Hold down the left mouse button and drag move the mouse pointer over the data to select it.

When you drag the mouse, hold down the left mouse button. You can also select data by clicking the mouse. To select a picture, such as a chart in Microsoft Excel or a photograph added to a Microsoft Word document, just click the picture to select it. Office displays rectangles, called handles, around the border of any selected picture, as shown in Figure Dragging the mouse pointer selects data in Office To select a picture, just click it once.

Handles Editing Data To select text with the mouse, you can click the mouse in one of three ways, as shown in Figure Selecting data with the keyboard To select data with the keyboard, you need to use the following keys: To select text, you can either double- or triple-click it. Getting to Know Microsoft Office The cursor movement keys simply move the cursor. The Shift key acts like the left mouse button and tells Office what to select.

To select data, you have to follow these steps: Move the cursor to the beginning or end of the data you want to select. Hold down the Shift key. Keep it pressed down. Move the cursor using any of the cursor movement keys, such as the up-arrow key or the End key. Release the Shift key. You may find it easier to place the cursor with the mouse and then hold down the Shift key while pressing a cursor movement key to select data more precisely than you can by dragging the mouse.

Selecting multiple chunks of data with the mouse and keyboard For greater flexibility in selecting data, you can use both the mouse and the keyboard to select multiple chunks of data at the same time. To select two or more chunks of data, follow these steps: Select a picture or chunk of text using either the keyboard or the mouse. Hold down the Ctrl key. Select another picture or chunk of test using either the keyboard or the mouse. Repeat Step 3 for each additional item you want to select.

Editing Data with the Pop-up Toolbar As soon as you select data, Office displays a pop-up toolbar that displays the most commonly used commands displayed as icons. This pop-up toolbar appears to the upper right of the data you selected as a faint image. The closer you move the mouse towards this pop-up toolbar, the darker and sharper the toolbar appears, as shown in Figure The farther you move away from the toolbar, the fainter it appears.

Editing Data Figure Whenever you select data, Office displays a pop-up toolbar in the upperright area. To use this pop-up toolbar, follow these steps: Select data using the mouse. Selecting data with the keyboard will not display the pop-up toolbar.

Move the mouse pointer to the area to the upper right of the selected data. The pop-up toolbar appears. The closer you move the mouse to the toolbar, the more visible the toolbar will appear. Click a command icon on the pop-up toolbar.

Deleting Data The simplest way to edit a file is to delete your existing data. If you just need to delete a single character, you can use one of two keys: Deletes the character immediately to the right of the cursor If you need to delete large chunks of text, follow these steps: Select the data you want to delete using either the keyboard or the mouse.

Press the Delete key. Office wipes away your data. When you paste data to a new location, you copy the data off the Clipboard and paste it in your file, as shown in Figure To move data, follow these steps: Choose one of the following: Move the cursor to a new location. To move data, you can first cut it from your file, store it on the Clipboard, and then paste it into a new location in your file. Editing Data If you select data in Step 3, you can replace the selected data with the pasted data you selected in Steps 1 and 2.

Copying and Pasting Data Unlike the Cut command, the Copy command leaves your selected data in its original location but places a second copy of that data somewhere else. To copy and paste data, follow these steps: To move data with the mouse, follow these steps: Move the mouse pointer over the highlighted data.

Hold down the left mouse button and drag move the mouse.

The mouse pointer displays an arrow and a box while the cursor turns into a dotted vertical line. Alternatively, to copy data, hold down the Ctrl key while holding down the left mouse button and dragging moving the mouse. The mouse pointer displays an arrow and a box with a plus sign while the cursor turns into a dotted vertical line. Move the dotted vertical line cursor where you want to place the data you selected in Step 1.

Release the left mouse button. Your data appears in its new location. Pretend I never chose it. Sometimes you may make many changes to your file and suddenly realize that the last five or ten changes you made messed up your data by mistake. Click the downward-pointing arrow that appears to the right of the Undo icon. A list of your previously chosen commands appears.

Move the mouse pointer to highlight all the commands that you want to undo, as shown in Figure Office undoes your chosen commands. The downwardpointing arrow to the right of the Undo icon lets you view a list of your last commands. Until you choose the Undo command at least once, the Redo icon appears dimmed.

The Redo command lets you reapply the last command you chose to undo. Each time you choose the Redo command, you reverse the effect of the last Undo command. For example, if you use the Undo command four times, you can choose the Redo command only up to four times. Sharing Data with Other Office Programs Cutting, copying, and pasting data may be handy within the same file, but Office also gives you the ability to cut, copy, and paste data between different programs, such as copying a chart from Excel and pasting it into a PowerPoint presentation.

This Windows Clipboard can only hold one item at a time, so Office comes with its own Clipboard called the Office Clipboard, which can store up to 24 items.

To store data on the Office Clipboard, you just need to use the Cut or Copy command, and Office automatically stores your data on the Office Clipboard. The Windows Clipboard can store only one item. The Windows Clipboard lets you paste only the last item cut or copied.

Viewing and pasting items off the Office Clipboard After you use the Cut or Copy command at least once, your data gets stored on the Office Clipboard. You can then view the Office Clipboard and choose which data you want to paste from the Clipboard into your file.

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To view the Office Clipboard and paste items from it, follow these steps: Move the cursor to the spot where you want to paste an item from the Office Clipboard. Click the Office Clipboard icon.

The Office Clipboard pane appears, as shown in Figure The Office Clipboard also displays an icon that shows you the program where the data came from, such as Word or PowerPoint. Click the item you want to paste. Office pastes your chosen item into the file where you moved the cursor in Step 1. The Office Clipboard pane lets you view the current contents of the Office Clipboard. Click the Close box of the Office Clipboard window to tuck it out of sight.

If you click the Paste All button, you can paste every item on the Office Clipboard into your file. The moment you add a 25th item, Office deletes the oldest item from the Office Clipboard to make room for the new cut or copied item.

You can also manually delete items from the Office Clipboard as well, by following these steps: Click the Office Clipboard icon refer to Figure The Office Clipboard appears.